Review: 2.17 White Tulip


Welcome to the FB review of Fringe season 2 episode 17 – “White Tulip“. In this review I present my honest opinions on both the good and bad aspects of the episode. I also take a look at the answers and unresolved mysteries, before sharing my thoughts on other aspects which may have been overlooked.

THE GOOD

  • The “Mythalone” strikes again. For the second week in a row, what would typically have been a standalone episode some 3 months ago, was crafted into an intriguing character drama with a healthy dose of mythology. I feel that this helps to validate my criticisms of the standalone episodes – good as they were, they lacked direct connection to the main storyline and didn’t contain the necessary ‘carry over’ from previous episodes. Much like the episode before it, “White Tulip” did a good job at maintaining the ongoing story, while inviting us back into the head-space of the characters. And because of that, I CARED. I also appreciated that while the case was ‘closed’ by the end of the episode, the drama with Walter, Peter and the Dunhamnator continues. There’s surely no going back now – 5 to 8 episodes like this per season alongside the myth-heavy installments and you have a winning formula, one I’m sure will get even better with time.
  • Faith and Science. It’s no secret that I love it when Fringe delves into issues of faith and science. I was really taken in by the philosophical debate had by Walter and Peck. It gave me a fuller perspective on the ‘Godless’ man that Walter once was and the man of faith that he is today. I also appreciated the level of respect shared between Walter and Peck – neither man imposed their views on the other, both men were emotionally invested in their own beliefs, yet equally considerate of the other’s point of view. I really dug the vibe in their scene towards the end and credit to the writers, Noble and Weller for delivering some really special moments.
  • A Good Antagonist. Dr. Peck was not just an interesting character who brought the cool time travel stuff, he also had a story. Sure, it could have been fleshed out a bit more, but I liked the fact that he had an understandable and human motivation for creating temporal pockets. I also enjoyed the presence that Peter Weller brought to the character.
  • Time Travel. As I’ll expand on later (and in the Observations column), I really enjoyed the time travel presented in this episode. It was one of the more bolder sci fi elements seen in the series so far but it also felt completely natural due to the human element that it tapped into. I also like the idea of time travel acting as another way to explore the redemption theme that has become a mainstay of the show.

THE BAD

  • Lack of Story Advancement. While we saw various iterations of the same events culminating in a changed outcome with Walter burning Peter’s letter (etc), there was effectively a lack of progression with this episode. It began with Walter writing a letter and pretty much ended with Walter burning a letter. I’m being harsh with this criticism because this was also the skill of the episode in telling a very specific story involving time travel. However, If I’m being honest I have to at least mention the fact that a small failing of this episode was the lack of advancement from a technical viewpoint, even though that was the point.
  • I find it a bit hard to believe that Walter would somehow contrive to lose Peter’s letter, and even harder to believe that Peter wouldn’t see it lying directly under his nose. I know, I know, they wanted to induce some drama while illustrating the idea that Walter’s secret was literally floating around in time as events repeated themselves. But still.
  • I really doubt that Olivia or Broyles would allow Walter the opportunity to talk Peck out of jumping back in time instead of using the snipers. From their perspective too many lives on the line. It’s as though Olivia and Broyles allowed Walter to talk to Peck because they thought it would make for a better, more emotionally engaging episode. Therein lies the contrivance. One I’m happy to give a free pass, I might add.
  • I found it a bit hard to believe that Walter would tell Peck how to go back further in time to achieve his goal of saving Arlette when he knew the potential damage this would cause. On the same token I guess it plays into the whole choices and consequences aspect, so I can forgive this contrivance. I do seem to be forgiving a lot of contrivances lately..
  • Slowest SWAT Team EVERRR. Seriously. I know it was for dramatic effect but it was as if those goons running backwards or something – it took them a lifetime to bust in on Walter and Peck! Broyles needs to move that quarterly review up.

UNRESOLVED MYSTERIES

  • Did Peck make a conscious choice to not save his wife and to instead die with her? Did Walter’s words about not meddling in the universe’s affairs (even though he still kinda did) have an effect on him?

ANSWERS

  • Peck’s time travelling required large amounts of energy, drained from anything within the target vicinity.
  • Peck’s fiancee was killed in a car accident on18th May. Peck was trying to go back in time to save her.
  • Peck was initially only able to achieve a 12 hour jump until Walter told him what he was doing wrong, enabling him to travel back to the moment before his wife was killed
  • Walter started to believe in God after he took Peter from the Other Side.

FRINGE THOUGHTS

  • It was sad to see Olivia dig herself further into a hole:

“I haven’t noticed anything [strange about Walter's behaviour]” *Olivia literally GULPS* :)

  1. Oh Olivia, if Peter was half as good at “reading people” as he likes to think, your face would have given the game away long before the ink on Walter’s letter had time to dry! I do feel for her though, it can’t be easy being between a rock and a hard place. I just worry that the longer this charade goes on the harder it will be for Peter to ever trust her again. I keep thinking back to “What Lies Below” when Peter bellowed the words: “You betrayed me!”. Foreshadowing, indeed.
  • Peter talking about Walter: “It’s like he’s enveloped in this…sadness”. Seeing as the envelope containing Walter’s letter was virtually a guest star in itself, I take it that this wording from the writers was very intentional.
  • I’ve previously speculated that one of the long term themes is the possibility that time lines/realities were being edited. Although I believe this could still come into play in a bigger way, the general idea was played out to an extent in “White Tulip” with Peck repeatedly going back in time in an attempt to change (edit) the past.
  • Walter and Astrid’s shared consciousness was a neat occurrence. Several things sprung to mind, including: last season when Walter mentioned that communication isn’t all we know it to be, which triggered our “proximity” observations with the idea that the characters closeness to each other opened up telepathic corridors of communication. My mind was also cast back to the Observers reading people’s mind – we saw this with August on Christine, and September on both Peter and Walter. I also wondered if there was a deeper connection with the idea that Walter’s guilt was literally leaking from his conscience, creating a connection where others, such as Astrid, could unwittingly tap into his thought processes. We could even take this a step further by relating it to the deja vu/time travel and the possibility that their shared consciousness was in some way derived from having already lived out this experience before (thanks to Peck’s repeated time travelling).

  • Speaking of which, Walter’s chat with Olivia about Peter echoes this idea:

Walter: “Every time I think I’m ready to tell him, I envision his reaction when he reads it and I run the scene in my mind again and again. And every time the outcome is…terrible.”

  1. That’s surely a reference to the reoccurring events. What I find really interesting about this is that Walter didn’t feel comfortable telling Peter the truth until he received God’s forgiveness, by way of a white tulip which he had little to no chance of receiving since they don’t bloom this time of year. Now, taking into consideration what I’ve said earlier, it could be argued that somehow these entire events were imagined or constructed to ensure that Walter moved on from his guilt – receiving his ‘sign from God’, thus giving him no further reason to stall on telling Peter the truth. I’m probably taking this concept too far, but I like the idea that the world of the show is in some way constructed from our characters inner most needs, wants and desires and driven by their subconscious (or a cosmic force). I’m not discounting Peck’s existence or his story, but I reckon he was also narrative device for a larger concept. We’ll see.

  • Time travel in the context of fate and freewill. It was interesting to see that the different iterations caused by Peck going back in time, for the most part, contained the same events and actions – constants. However, there were some interesting differences, including the various ways in which our gang apprehended Peck, and also Walter’s ultimate decision to burn his confession letter to Peter. I find this to be noteworthy as it shows that even slight changes in Peck’s interactions with the past adjusted future events by some degree. That said, Peck’s time travelling also showed that although fate can be altered, the universe does seem to have a general tendency to want to keep people on the same path to some extent. It’s interesting to consider what exactly governed Walter’s choice to burn the letter when previously he had every intention to tell Peter the truth on that day. I have no doubt it’s connected to his ‘unconscious’ experience of the Peck case.
  • Olivia totally had a DUUUUUDE! moment upon experiencing ‘deja vu’. Yes Liv, season 1, episode 19. :)
  • Peter’s comment about deja vu being the universe’s way of saying that you’re right in line with your own destiny makes me wonder whether Peter’s destiny changed slightly after being taken from his own world. Obviously his still important, but to what extent?
  • Peter’s next line was from the top Fringe drawer:

“I never get [deja vu] myself, probably because I’m not on track with my own destiny.”

  1. Close your mouth Walter, you’ll catch flies!

  • Some of the best moments in the episode came in the debate between Peck and Walter. Peck offers an interesting interpretation on the laws of nature. He suggests that they are not necessarily “binding”, implying that while nature makes it difficult, she doesn’t make it impossible for us to get around. He actually makes a good point – perhaps nature’s ‘laws’ have loopholes for a reason? Then again, just because we can do something, doesn’t necessarily mean that we should.
  • Peck:

“Each jump back clears that slate”

  1. Great line. Even better was Walter warning him of the consequences that even a successful jump with no deaths would leave on his conscience. As well as the idea that any adjustment made to the universe will result in a change of some kind – the slate isn’t simply wiped clean. Funnily enough this reminded me of Dollhouse, in that respect *Dollhouse reference alert*, with the idea that “imprints” are retained. The universe is basically an “Active”. :)

  • The Red Balloon was a neat device:

Peck: “On the day of the crash we argued [..] I became drawn to something on the horizon, a large red ball, it was a hot air balloon, moored on the city’s outskirts out on this field. I spent a whole day on this field, looking at this balloon. Then I got my answer. I had an epiphany, of how to physically apply my theories of time travel. I was in that field, the moment her car was hit[..] if I done what she asked me to, I know it wouldn’t have happened.”

  1. Firstly, what a wonderfully tragic story. The words “Red Balloon” scream out at me for thematic reasons as I’m sure the color choice was no coincidence. Peck’s story also got me wondering about this balloon and whether it was really a coincidental attraction, or whether there was some design in it being there at that time, sparking Peck’s epiphany. I say this because it’s quite similar to Walter’s white tulip device – seemingly sign from God that in actual fact was a sign from Science AKA Peck (was Peck also proving a point for his own God by doing this, perhaps?). For me, the red balloon may also have been a sign. Time travel brings us closer to the possibility that someone or something is able to guide our Fringies down certain paths, presenting signposts along their journey to effect a specific outcome as part of a much larger, much grander design.
  • I also have to note the symmetry of Peck having the epiphany in the red balloon field and going back to that moment in a bid to save his wife. Again, how coincidental was the red balloon, really? Had it not been for that balloon Peck probably wouldn’t have had his light bulb moment and his wife may still have died. The red balloon, whether a construct or a cosmic sign, offered Peck hope  (just as the Door to the alternate universe did for Walter) of bringing a loved one back from the dead. I just find this potential concept really interesting.
  • Question: Does the alternate universe have an energy deficit due to the Blight killing the plants and trees? I ask because with energy being a recurring theme I wonder whether that will come into play at all.
  • A couple of weeks ago I speculated when it was that Walter developed faith in God. It was interesting to hear him reveal that taking Peter was indeed the turning point for him in that respect. Whether or not God exists in the world of the show is up for debate but the IDEA of God certainly does. And this idea makes for a powerful dynamic because you have a disbeliever turned believer. Walter Bishop: man of science, and faith.
  • Walter reveals that God must exist because he’s been punished for what he did. It’s strange to hear Walter talk like that but I can see what he means. It’s great to get inside Walter’s head and to see what he’s thinking.

  • And now for one of the best deliveries of the entire season:

Walter: “So now I’m looking for a sign of forgiveness. ..I’ve asked God for a sign of forgiveness..a specific one, a white tulip”

Oh man Walter, wait to go and pull on those heart strings :( John Noble’s interpretation of that line was simply inspired. I also loved the next exchange between Peck and Walter:

Peck: Tulips don’t bloom this time of year, white or otherwise”

Walter: But he’s GOD.. And if God can forgive me for my acts then maybe, it’s in the realm of possibility that my son might possibly, may be able to forgive me too.”

  1. Wow. It did amuse me how often he used ‘maybe’ and ‘possibly’, but it’s in-keeping with Walter’s fragile hope – almost so fragile that he doesn’t want to be so presumptuous as to even think that God’s forgiveness would automatically mean that Peter would follow suit. It helps illustrate the power of hope, and somehow reminds me of Olivia’s Pandora’s Box reference at the end of the previous episode with the idea that amongst the evils that were placed in the box was also the gift of hope, always the last to arrive but healing the wounds of the soul.
  • Peck offers Walter a reality check:

Peck: “Walter, God is Science. God is Polio and Flu vaccines, and MRI machines and artificial hearts. If you’re a man of science then that’s the only faith we need”

  1. I’m really glad he said this as it somehow makes science less ambiguous, almost giving it a face.
  • Walter keeps it real and suggests that universe wont be happy:

Walter: “You don’t know how things will be changed by your actions, but they will. It’s not our place to adjust the universe”

  • Another classic Walter line:

Walter: I have travelled through madness to figure this out, and you will too”

  1. I love the idea of madness being something Walter has travelled through. For me, this line is right up there with August’s “she crossed my mind, somehow, she never left”. I’ll check this after I’ve completed my review but I wonder if these two episodes were written by the same writers?
  • I like the fact that Peck got to tell his wife “I love you” before fate did its thing, but he REALLY should have said “drive, baby, drive!” first. :) RIP Peck.

FINAL THOUGHT

I think what most appealed to me about this episode was it’s relevance to Walter’s personal dilemmas. Time travel was an effective metaphor for Walter’s own attempts to undo the past, again positioning science as the bearer of second chances while also contrasting it with Walter’s need for God to give him another chance.

The ‘White Tulip drawing device’ was brilliant. I didn’t expect it until the very last moment and I found myself really wanting to know whether Walter completely saw this as a sign from God and his ‘mysterious ways’, or whether he had an inkling that another force may also have played a part. I guess it could still be viewed as God’s work either way. I have to say I was disappointed in Walter’s decision to burn the letter. At that stage it looked as though he had decided to wait for his sign before telling Peter the truth. Fortunately it came signed, sealed and delivered moments later. His reaction was priceless – “Oh..thanks GOD!” :) Actually, it was probably a mixture of gratitude and dread.

For the 1,000,000th time: Do the right thing, Walter..

Best Moment: Walter receiving the white tulip.

Best Performer: John Noble

If you enjoyed “White Tulip”, you’ll like: “The Equation”, “Midnight”, “Olivia. In The Lab..”

Episode Rating: 8/10

Comments

  1. Anjali says

    Great review as always Roco.

    I enjoyed this episode a lot. Weller and Noble had fantastic chemistry and it showed throughout. I also enjoyed the subtle differences with each time jump.

    The ‘White Tulip’ at the end made me tear up a little. Wyman and Fleming did a fantastic job with this one.

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  2. MRG says

    Ah finally. I have been eagerly awaiting your review. So first of all, I thought this was a great episode. I think I said Wow like 15 times. After the first time jump, I was a bit wary. As a story device, the whole ‘groundhog day’ thing is a bit played out and boring. But leave it to Fringe to breathe new life in it. I love the nuance with which each jump was made, sublte differences and reactions to make it interesting. I am not going to go in to all the other parts I really liked since Roco did it so well for us. :)

    “Time travel in the context of fate and freewill. It was interesting to see that the different iterations caused by Peck going back in time, for the most part, contained the same events and actions – constants.”
    Its so funny you mentioned this. I had just been thinking about fate/destiny and free will in the context of the alternate universe. In the alternate universe Walter is still a scientist, Olivia and Broyles still work for a special division of FBI working on the same cases at the same time. So to some extent, it seems as if free will doesn’t really matter. Our destiny is laid out before us. I don’t doubt that free will is still a rather important part of life and affects outcomes (as seen when Robocop finally does go back in time and gets smushed by a car)…but to what extent on a global or a personal scale? Does the path we take in life really matter if we all end up in the same place anyway? I don’t know. More importantly, I don’t really know how these issues fit in with the overall Fringe sotryline either. But it sure is interesting to contemplate.
    Although,

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  3. MRG says

    (sorry, accidently hit submit)

    Although, I thought it was wierd that Peter explained Deja vu as being in the place where you were supposed to be, when Walter has previously explained Deja Vu as being a “glimpse” to the other side to both of them. I know that his words fit into the whole “Peter-is-not-where-he’s-supposed-to-be-and-its-all-Walter’s-fault” thing or maybe it was just supposed to be light banter. But still.

    As for the exchange between Walter and Astrid (who he is still calling Astro, and she doesn’t even bother correnting him now)…maybe I’m not reading enough into it, but I didn’t get the shared conciousness angle. I just thought it was a marker of how close they had become and how their relationship has grown. Its not uncommon when you work closely with someone for a long time that you are able to anticipate what their next move is going to be. In adddtion, Scientists tend to be a consistent lot. We tend to approach problems in similar ways, no matter how different. The fact that Walter wanted to corroborate the mitochondeial findings in the other victims is the logical next move. Astro’s ;) knowing that just shows how well she’s fitting in.

    Anyway, the only thing better than the episode was the promos for next week. How many days til Thursday?

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  4. Tulip says

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  5. says

    I thought it was hilarious that Walter got his “White Tulip” in a form he didn’t expect.

    Y’know, I was watching “Saving Grace” when Grace (Holly Hunter) started yelling at God, finally, because she had been molested by a Catholic priest as a child. God “appeared” for her to yell at, only he was this ugly mutt just outside the window, sitting there, not saying ANYTHING. What’s funny, too, was Grace knew it was God, and you, the viewer, knew it was God. I laughed so hard I almost fell out of my chair.

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  6. says

    I thought it was hilarious that Walter got his “White Tulip” in a form he didn’t expect.

    Y’know, I was watching “Saving Grace” when Grace (Holly Hunter) started yelling at God, finally, because she had been molested by a Catholic priest as a child. God “appeared” for her to yell at, only he was this ugly mutt just outside the window, sitting there, not saying ANYTHING. What’s funny, too, was Grace knew it was God, and you, the viewer, knew it was God. I laughed so hard I almost fell out of my chair.

    Same kind of reaction, though not so hilarious as much as endearing. God sent him a “white tulip” through a person who had a conversation that never existed, only it did, and that person was an agnostic.

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  7. mlj102 says

    Lack of Story Advancement: I think I understand what you’re saying with this one: for seeing a whole episode, we didn’t actually end up with any real progression in the lives of the characters because essentially everything got reset so that all that we saw happen — all the character interactions and such — didn’t actually happen. Yeah, I found that fact to be rather frustrating, though, like you, I can see how it was also part of what made the story so effective.

    Olivia and Broyles allowing Walter to talk to Peck: I can believe Olivia going along with it, simply because she knows Walter’s secret. Consequently, she would clearly be able to see the connection between what Walter did and what Peck is doing, so she can understand why Walter might be effective in getting through to him. Now, if this had happened before she found out about Peter, I would agree that it would make no sense for her to be willing to allow it. But given what she knows, it makes sense. That said, I agree that Broyles being willing to go along with it is a bit of a stretch. Perhaps his decision was influenced by the fact that Olivia was supportive of it…

    Slow SWAT team: I completely agree with you on that one, though I am more than willing to forgive that contrivance because, when Walter said he was going to tell him something he’d never told anyone before, and we cut away to see the SWAT team moving in, I panicked. For a split second, I could completely see them having the SWAT team burst into the room, and leave us never finding out what he was going to say. That would have been torture.

    “It was sad to see Olivia dig herself further into a hole”: Tell me about it. I was more than a little disappointed with that. I can understand that she is in an extremely difficult position, but flat out lying about that is not going to help anyone. Anyone could see that Walter was acting strangely. The fact that she told him she hadn’t noticed anything has got to stand out as suspicious as well as hurting their relationship a bit. I don’t see why it would have hurt anything if she had just acknowledged that, yes, Walter did seem to be acting a bit strange. It’s not like she would have had to tell Peter anything about what she knew — it would simply be a matter of agreeing with Peter’s observations.

    That said, it would seem that Olivia has decided to step back and leave things in Walter’s hands and let him address it when and how he sees fit to. I can understand why she would make that decision: Walter has decided Peter needs to know the truth, and it’s his place to tell him. It seemed obvious that she is trying as hard as she can to remove herself from the situation as much as possible and not interfere. I sure feel bad for her being caught in the middle of this. Yes, she owes it to Peter to be honest with him, and I hate that she has resorted to flat out lying about certain things, but I can understand why she’s doing that, and I can’t really blame her for it, and I can only hope that Peter will also be understanding of the unique position she was in.

    “It’s interesting to consider what exactly governed Walter’s choice to burn the letter when previously he had every intention to tell Peter the truth on that day.”: Okay, so here’s my take on the situation. In the previous two times we saw Walter write his letter, he was interrupted by Peter’s phone call. He didn’t really have time to think about actually giving it to him and how to proceed. So the lack of time sort of made his decision for him, and he put it in his pocket until he could fully contemplate it all later. We have no way of knowing if Walter would have ultimately decided to burn the letter rather than giving it to Peter on those times, as well. Then, on the final time we saw him writing the letter, there was no case, so he never got interrupted. So he was able to finish writing, think about it, and ultimately decide he couldn’t give it to Peter. Maybe he decided that telling Peter the truth through writing wasn’t the best method. Or maybe he decided he wasn’t going to tell Peter until he got his sign of forgiveness, so he got rid of the letter and decided not to deal with it until he received his sign. Who knows?

    And, a couple of other thoughts:

    The ending: Fringe has had some incredible endings — memorable endings, emotional endings, powerful endings, unexpected endings — but I think this is the first one that truly left me speechless and at a loss for words. The whole time, I seriously had no idea what to expect. I was genuinely curious to find out what Peck was going to do: if he would listen to Walter’s warnings, or if he would go through with his plan to save his fiancee. When the truck hit their car, I was stunned and didn’t know how to react. It was heartbreaking, but at the same time, a brilliant way to resolve everything. And the white tulip at the end was just as powerful. I had been trying to think what he would send Walter, expecting some brief words of wisdom or something along those lines. But the tulip was brilliant and said more than any words could have conveyed. The whole thing was a masterpiece that left me in awe.

    Theme: I’ve mentioned before that I think one of the main themes in Fringe is the power of love and the things people will do for love. From The Same Old Story, when Christopher confessed that, while Dr. Penrose should have let him die, he had kept him alive because he loved him, to Midnight when Nicholas Boone literally gave his life for his wife and posed the question “How far would you go for someone you love?”, to August and his willingness to do something he’d never done before by interfering, and then ultimately to give his own life so that Christine could become important and be allowed to live, to the way love for his family is what motivated Walter to go to the other side to try and cure Peter, and then ultimately keep Peter over here, this theme is abundant in Fringe.

    And this episode continued with all that and emphasized that theme perfectly. Peck was willing to do whatever was necessary to be able to see his fiancee again. He loved her that much. He was willing to implant those metal parts all over his body. He was willing to risk his life in traveling through time. He was willing to go to extreme measures just for the possibility that he could save her. And when Walter told him his own similar story and warned him of the consequences, he was willing to simply go back in time and die with her. I echo what Olivia said in Midnight as she reflected on Nicholas Boone: “I was just thinking about Nicholas Boone and what he did for his wife. What he is doing. Just that kind of love…” It’s truly remarkable. The same can be said for Peck — there wasn’t anything that he wasn’t willing to do for his fiancee and it amazes me that he loved her that much.

    There’s nothing quite so powerful as love. Love drives us to do things that, under any other circumstances, we wouldn’t even consider doing. And, in the long run, love seems to always triumph. That’s why I am optimistic for things working out between our favorite “odd little family” after Peter learns the truth. As intense and as severe as his anger and feelings of betrayal are likely to be, I believe that his love for Walter and Olivia will ultimately outweigh his hurt and anger.

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    • says

      mlj:“Okay, so here’s my take on the situation. In the previous two times we saw Walter write his letter, he was interrupted by Peter’s phone call. He didn’t really have time to think about actually giving it to him and how to proceed. So the lack of time sort of made his decision for him, and he put it in his pocket until he could fully contemplate it all later. We have no way of knowing if Walter would have ultimately decided to burn the letter rather than giving it to Peter on those times, as well. Then, on the final time we saw him writing the letter, there was no case, so he never got interrupted. So he was able to finish writing, think about it, and ultimately decide he couldn’t give it to Peter. Maybe he decided that telling Peter the truth through writing wasn’t the best method. Or maybe he decided he wasn’t going to tell Peter until he got his sign of forgiveness, so he got rid of the letter and decided not to deal with it until he received his sign. Who knows?”

      That’s a nice take on it, mlj. I agree that this may have been the writers intention when crafting the scene. It makes sense too – illustrating the fine lines that influence our choices.

      With this in mind, it seems even more poignant that the ripple effect created by Peck’s final jump influenced Walter in extremely different ways within the space of a couple of minutes. The “reset” of that day’s events prompting him to burn the letter and delay the truth, and the white tulip eliminating any more excuses for stalling. God (or Science) has an ironic sense of humour.

      Although I do feel as though Walter at least had the intention of telling Peter before the final “reset”, I agree that there was no guarantee that he would have done so on that day (although the universe seemed keen on presenting the letter in Peter’s path). My takeaway from this would be that it’s perhaps not so much the when, but the how.

      Thanks for sharing!

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  8. charliefan19 says

    Loved the scene between Walter and Peck. Two brilliant guys who “read” each other, clearly admired one another, and in the end both helped each other to a certain extent. You could tell RoboCop was drinking in every word Walter was saying, even though he didn’t want to take his advice. It was like Peck was saying, “Wow, a guy like me who understands…FINALLY!” There seemed to be a great deal of respect between them

    I didn’t really get why Walter told Peck how to hit his target jump…seemed a bit unrealistic even for Walter after he talked about the casualties that would result. Maybe it was the respect thing again that I felt Walter had for Peck…but still, hundreds of casualties seems the greater of two evils….

    As a Christian, i loved how Walter talked about his faith and quest for forgiveness from God. Beautiful scene between him and RoboCop, just loved it.

    Did anyone else feel that Peter was fishing for info from Olivia, or that he was merely telling her about Walter’s sadness? We’ve seen in the past how heis good at reading people and knowing when something isn’t right. He should be able to tell that Olivia has indeed “noticed something.” Hmm, anyway, just a thought I had. :)

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    • MRG says

      Walter has that history though. Remember Olivia and the tank? He knew how dangerous it was, and kept telling Olivia that over and over again. Yet, ever single time he helped her do it.

      I suppose its the idea of separating science from ethics. Inherently, sciene and knowledge isn’t unethical. Its what we do WITH the knowledge that determines morality. Maybe its Walter’s way of making up for declaring himself god. He puts the knowledge out there with the warnings for its implications. What others choose to do with it is up to them.

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  9. Elaine says

    Wow, mlj, your post nearly made me tear up. You’re so correct about one of the primary themes of Fringe being about love…as the Bible aptly describes, it does conquer all. Because it believes, hopes and endures all things. So, what I find interesting in contrast is we’ve seen examples of these otherwise godless men of science go to such extremes not in the name of science…but for love. Walter for a son that was a slight variation of his own. Dr. Boone for his wife. August (whom I’m assuming wasn’t even human) for the child that wasn’t his, but that he grew to love. Even Olivia, who was willing to put her own life in danger as well as travel half way around the world to enlist help to save John Scott’s life. That kind of love is powerful, moving and unbreakable.

    While I was disappointed in Walter burning that letter to Peter, I also understood his reason behind doing so. As I can understand Olivia’s motivation…although like you and Roco, I wish she hadn’t just flat out lied to Peter.

    Anyway, as I was re-watching this episode with my sister yesterday, there were a couple of things that struck me that may or may not have been intentional, but, I figured I toss them out there and see if they stick. :-)

    One thing of notice was Olivia’s hair. For the better part of S2, she’s worn it pulled back in a ponytail, which is a stark contrast to S1 when she often wore it don. So, when she decidedly lets it down at the end of ‘Jacksonville’ before heading out on her non-date, date with Peter, it felt like the first time in a very long time she wasn’t as emotionally bound up. Since she’s discovered the truth about Peter, the pony is back; and in ‘White Tulip’, it’s doubly reinforced in a knot–like an indication of how difficult being complicit with this lie has become.

    Also, I like how the writers are allowing Walter and Astrid’s relationship to build–even to the point they’re completing each others thoughts. I think all season long as they’ve steadily built to this reveal, they’ve also shown us that Astrid is going to be there for Walter no matter what. And Walter is likely going to need someone on his side once Peter discovers the truth.

    Personally, I thought Broyles going along with Walter talking to Peck made sense, because I think we’ve seen Broyles having to make quite a few leap of faith decisions regarding his team this season. Trust that was based more on by-the-book procedure in S1 than we see now. Walter and Peter are consultants afterall, so, I would imagine that affords Broyles some leeway in the type of cases they investigate.

    One other thing that came to mind was the actual time traveling itself. When I saw the blue lights, and sort of glimmer around Dr. Peck as he readied to jump, or better yet, arrived to his destination, I instantly thought of the Observers…especially in ‘The Arrival’ when the blue lights were a major player as September walks out to the middle of the construction site and reports the arrival of that beacon. Maybe the blue lights are a stitching back of the fabric of time and space after something or someone passes through it…? I realize we’ve seen those lights in other instances like Olivia’s dreamscapes in the tank…but even then, she was tapping into moments that had already passed in linear time. Accessing memories that weren’t hers would require (if we’re applying the theories thrown out there in this episode supporting time travel) a great deal of energy. Something Walter stated back in S1, our brains were essentially electrical routers. So (and I realize I’m going all stream of consciousness here) perhaps that’s why Olivia was placed in the tank…just as Walter chose the lake as the place to cross over because it could absorb the dispersement of energy needed to pull off such a thing. It would explain (I think) why Peck chose that field at the end because something other than hundreds of humans and any electrical devices in the surrounding area needed to offset the energy created to complete the time jump. Like Brandon said in ‘August’, the Obervers aren’t limited by our human perception of time….perhaps they’ve discovered, or always possessed an ability to jump through space and time without same adverse effects. I don’t know, I’m rambling at this point, so, let me stop.

    Despite the comment regarding the dreaded stand-alone/myth/myth-alone on-going debate, great review as always, Roco. ;-)

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  10. LizW65 says

    “The words “Red Balloon” scream out at me for thematic reasons as I’m sure the color choice was no coincidence. Peck’s story also got me wondering about this balloon and whether it was really a coincidental attraction, or whether there was some design in it being there at that time, sparking Peck’s epiphany.”

    It could be inteneded to echo, among other things, the red balloon that drifted to the ceiling of the subway station in “Bad Dreams”, as well as the German pop song “99 Luftballoons” (sp?) which deals with the accidental triggering of a nuclear war.

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    • says

      Interresting that you brought up the Song, which is actually written “99 Luftballons”.

      Here’s the end of the English version:
      99 dreams I have had (-> Walter often thought about telling Peter, “Bad Dreams”)
      In every one a red balloon (-> Not one these times it ended well)
      It’s all over and I’m standin’ pretty (-> forgiveness, self-confidence)
      In this dust that was a city (-> destroyed relationship, Alter-Boston)
      If I could find a souvenier (-> Something from the AU -> Peter)
      Just to prove the world was here… (-> Prooving the AU)
      And here is a red balloon (-> The Sin Walter did)
      I think of you and let it go. (-> Finally telling Peter)

      Suits pretty much, I think

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    • says

      Liz: “It could be inteneded to echo, among other things, the red balloon that drifted to the ceiling of the subway station in “Bad Dreams”, as well as the German pop song “99 Luftballoons” (sp?) which deals with the accidental triggering of a nuclear war.”

      Liz,
      I like your “Bad Dreams” reference because it fits with my speculation on the Red Balloon, on some level, representing a construct or manifestation.

      I’m not sure that the writers had this intention, but on an intrinsic level I like the idea of the balloon/dreams/signs reference bleeding over.

      Thanks for the juice.

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  11. Elaine says

    It could be inteneded to echo, among other things, the red balloon that drifted to the ceiling of the subway station in “Bad Dreams”,

    ~~~~

    That was my first thought.

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  12. Iz says

    I found it very interesting that olivia was the only one to experience deja vu even though all of them had been there before. I understand why peter wouldn’t, but what about water?

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  13. Melissa says

    You really think Peter doesn’t know Olivia’s hiding something? Because it seemed to me they tried to show during the episode that Peter was pretty sure they were having the how-do-we-tell-him-Grandad-is-dead crisis and was trying to convince them he could handle it.
    I thought it was a pretty average episode UNTIL the white tulip. When Walter opened the envelope and showed what it was I went from “fine” to “nearly bursting into tears”.

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    • FringeFan2009 says

      I think that Peter does know that Olivia might be hiding something, but I think that he respects Olivia and believes that if she is hiding something, it would be for a good reason.

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  14. Melissa says

    Oh,I almost forgot! When Peter talked about deja vu I was like “Dude, don’t you remember Walter’s class on Alternate Universes???”. PAY ATTENTION, PETER. Or maybe I guess he just didn’t believe Walter or something.

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    • mlj102 says

      You bring up a good point that Peter might actually be aware that Olivia and Walter are keeping something from him. I’ve actually considered that possibility and I think it would be interesting if they went that route. Peter is certainly good at reading people — he knows that something isn’t quite right and it would make sense if he has picked up on Olivia’s strange behavior in connection with him and Walter. However, I didn’t see it as much as Peter was trying to convince them that he could handle whatever they knew, more like he was testing out Olivia, testing his theory that she might know something that he doesn’t know. Actually, I have to say I feel a lot of sympathy for Peter right now. As far as he’s concerned, both Olivia and Walter started acting strange for no apparent reason. He’s trying to go on like normal, but his family clearly isn’t the same as it was a few weeks ago. And no one will tell him why. That’s got to be tough.

      As for the deja vu, I also found it strange that no one made the connection to Walter’s previous explanation of it being a glimpse into the other side. But I didn’t mind Peter’s alternative explanation or view it as him disagreeing with Walter’s explanation, simply because it was just another attempt at explaining deja vu. Another way of looking at it. They’re both just theories. Walter’s explanation of deja vu being a sort of window to another reality is no more official than Peter’s suggestion that it’s fate’s way of telling you you’re where you need to be. And, really, the two work together quite well. Theoretically, if you’re where you’re supposed to be, then that’s where you’ll be in the other reality as well. Right? So Peter not having deja vu would be because he doesn’t have an alternate self and because he, technically speaking, isn’t where he’s supposed to be.

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      • bdp says

        I really hope you’re both right about Peter at least sensing something is going on. I feel like he at least has a hint of it, his facial expressions usually convey some sense “what am I not being let in on?” whenever he talks to Walter or Olivia. And I also agree that, yes we’ve been well informed through the series that Peter is indeed very good at reading people, especially Olivia, so if all the sudden he is now clueless as to how to read people I’d be a little upset

        I mean even back to last week when Peter and Olivia discussed the “near-kiss”, I think Peter deciding that the Jacksonville trip was the reason for the awkwardness between him and Olivia goes back to his disbelief of Olivia’s “murders” in Bad Dreams, when Walter called out Peter for sometimes only believing Olivia when she says what he wants to hear. I think he just wanted things to be okay between them so he took what he could get, I don’t think it was him suddenly losing his ability to read people. I really hope that’s the case anyways.

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        • mlj102 says

          I can understand last week and Peter attributing Olivia’s unusual behavior to the almost kiss in Jacksonville. It was certainly something that could explain her sudden shift in behavior and I think it was a logical conclusion based on all that he knew. But now that her behavior is continuing to be a little off, and now that Walter is also acting strangely, I would expect him to pick up on that and figure that something else is going on.

          I like what you pointed out about Bad Dreams and what Walter said about Peter only believing Olivia when she says what he wants to hear. I think that’s important to keep in mind. Peter is incredibly perceptive and good at reading people — particularly Olivia for some reason — but, ironically, it also seems that Olivia is also the one person who is most able to deceive Peter. Remember in the Pilot the way Olivia was able to trick Peter into helping her and how Peter was rather incredulous to learn that she had been bluffing the whole time and he hadn’t been able to see it. It’s almost as if he cares about her so much, that he allows his sixth sense of being able to read people to be clouded and impaired where she is concerned.

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          • bdp says

            That’s a good point about Olivia’s bluff in the Pilot, I did always like that scene and I like how it set up things in the series even now, like you said it set up how we’ve come to learn that Peter is extremely perceptive especially with reading people but Olivia has always, from the very first episode, been able to pull things over on Peter.

            I think it’s a really interesting dynamic in their relationship that Peter is both one of the few people who can see beneath Olivia’s emotional front that she puts up (as well as one of the only people she actually lets see that side of her) and yet Olivia is the one he most often takes at her word, whether it’s the truth or not. I definitely agree with your assessment that it seems that he cares about her so much that he kind of let’s his doubting/perceptive guard down and doesn’t catch things with her that he would often catch with others.

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      • Oscar says

        Well, I must say that sometimes (and this episode is one of those times…) I’m under the impression that we have no proofs of Peter’s ability in “reading people” other that his own assertions about it… :-)

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  15. andrewsauer says

    Wow, one thing you can say about FRINGE is they know how to properly use their guest stars. That scene where Peck was installing that new cog into his already mechanically modified torso seemed almost like an homage to the awesomely horrific body horror and gore that characterized the Robocop movies. I loved this episode but the end left me with a few questions…
    Peck knew he could jump into that field because he spent the whole day watching the balloon there. Well if the original Peck was there when he jumped back in time shouldn’t he have been drained of power by the jump or at least have been there to see himself time traveling? And not that it matters but what is the coroner going to think when he gets a hold of (future) Peck’s body?

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  16. Inter-dimensional Dave says

    Hey Roco,
    Thematically the “Red Balloon” and Weller’s character “Peck” held special significance to me also. (I also shared this theory with my friends over at the Fringe podcast.) I’m a bit of a movie geek so when I saw that red balloon I instantly thought of the 1957 French short film classic “The Red Balloon” by Albert Lamorisse. In that movie a young boy wanders the streets of Paris in loneliness. He is befriended by a red balloon with preternatural sentience. They become inseparable friends. Jealous youths stone the balloon and the boy is yet again left alone. But in that moment of sorrow the boy finds liberation. For befriending the red balloon all the balloons of Paris come to him and carry him away from his pain across the rooftops of the city. Similarly, when Peck has his encounter with the red balloon he too finds his liberation as he realizes he can break the shackles of his remorse and fly to the side of his loved one. I wonder if the writers of Fringe are familiar with this classic film short that won two Oscars for writing and screenplay back in 1957.

    I thought I caught a parallel in the Name “Peck ” also. Gregory Peck played the role of Captain Ahab in the classic movie “Moby Dick”. Ahab was obsessed with tracking down the white whale even if it cost the lives of others. Our Fringe Peck was similarly obsessed with tracking down his answers and many lives were lost in his quest. In the end both men sacrificed themselves in order to find resolution.

    Thoughts?

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    • says

      Great connections Dave. “The Red Balloon” film reference seems like the kind of hat-tip the writers would sneak in.

      Thanks for the share!

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  17. says

    OK Just a quick questions…I may have missed this being discussed.
    Did anyone notice that the alternate Walter didn’t have a Carla Warren in his lab? Wouldn’t that mean that the alternate Walter never went to Saint Claire’s and maybe he is the power house on the other side not Bell.

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  18. Jacksonheights says

    The theme of love may indeed be what Fringe is about but sometimes love is selfish. The abduction of another mans child in Walters case, Pecks willingness to go back in time and alter the course of events so he could say goodbye to his fiancee and even the scientist who assisted his son in sucking out the pitutary gland of helpless women may be powerful but not what I would call “love conquering all”. I think the writers are trying to show emotions have many layers some positive and some negative depending on how they are interpreted by the individual.

    Olivia sidestepping the issue of telling Peter the truth. He is not her son, brother or lover. Who really would want to get in the middle of that mess. It may be keeping her up at night but it is not her place to reveal that kind of information, especially now with assurances from Walter that he will tell him. When will he tell him.. I hope we don’t have to wait until the season finale.

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    • Elaine says

      Neither would I, but then Walter and Dr. Pecks actions and the consequences of those actions weren’t displays of “love conquering all”…they were just as you stated, selfish…born out of grief and pain.

      Ultimately, I feel that wherever this show and its characters are taken, I do believe that the love that’s grown between them will be a deciding, certainly a motivating factor in how things unfold. Which, imo, will be where love will conquer all.

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    • mlj102 says

      “The theme of love may indeed be what Fringe is about but sometimes love is selfish.”

      You make an interesting point… I agree, but at the same time, I disagree. I mentioned that the theme is essentially “The things you do for love”, as presented in Nicholas Boone’s question: “How far would you go for someone you love?” The whole point is that love motivates us to go to extreme lengths and do things that we would not normally do. That is the power of love. And sometimes the things we do for love can be misguided, fueled by selfish reasons — but we do them because we love. It’s because you love that person — you care about them so deeply — that you are willing to ignore common sense and other similar things for that person. So it may cause us to do selfish things or act irrationally, but it isn’t the love that is selfish, it’s the way we respond to it that may be selfish. So it’s kind of what you said when you said, “emotions have many layers some positive and some negative depending on how they are interpreted by the individual.”

      For example, look at Walter and what he did for Peter. He was willing to disregard all warnings, all risks, and travel to another reality to cure an alternate version of his son. Then he was willing to break a promise and essentially kidnap alternate Peter and keep him here. I don’t think anybody would claim that those are good things. They were foolish, selfish, and unacceptable. But the reason for doing them was that he loved his son. If it had been, for example, the girl in the red dress who lived across the street who had died, I can imagine Walter would have felt bad, maybe he’d have tried to help her, but I don’t think he would have done any of the things he did in crossing to the other side, etc., because he didn’t love her. It was the very fact that he loved Peter so much that he was willing to do anything to keep him alive and to keep him with him. The actions weren’t acceptable. But the love was real, pure, and powerful.

      Saying that love is selfish is saying that you would rather have your way than sacrifice for that person you say you love. And I don’t think that’s true. That’s not real love. All of the examples we have talked about here show that the person was willing to sacrifice for the person they loved. They may have been misguided, but I think that ultimately, they truly believed they were doing what was best for that person they loved. Walter couldn’t bear to let alternate Peter die — he was concerned for his life. Same with Peck — he couldn’t just let the woman he loved die in an awful accident. And, yes, there was also an amount of selfishness to how they responded to their love — while they were thinking about the person they loved and how that person should be able to continue to live, they were also thinking about themselves and how they wanted that person to be able to live. But it’s because they love them. That doesn’t mean their actions were right — you could say they were blinded by their love, so they couldn’t actually see what was best for the person they loved and for others who would be affected by their actions — but I don’t think that makes their love selfish.

      As for love conquering all, I view that more as in love conquers anger, love conquers hate, love conquers conflict — not necessarily love always prompts you to do the right thing. As Elaine said, I think we will see that shown in how the love between the main characters will conquer whatever things may arise that could separate them. We have the upcoming reveal of Peter learning the truth, which will lead to anger, disappointment, and possibly separation. But I believe that Peter has developed a very powerful love for both Walter and Olivia and that that love will conquer whatever feelings of anger and betrayal he may have when he learns the truth.

      I don’t know if I’m doing a very good job at explaining this one, and I’ve already written too much, so I’m just going to stop by saying that I think we can do selfish things in the name of love, but that doesn’t make the love selfish.

      And, one final comment on your other point: “Who really would want to get in the middle of that mess.”

      No one would. But that’s just it. Olivia didn’t want to get in the middle of that mess, but that’s exactly where she has found herself. By simply learning the truth about Peter, she was thrown in the middle of it all. I think that’s why it has been so hard for her to figure out what to do. Technically, she shouldn’t be in that position, she had no part in it, but she’s still there and she had to figure out how to respond to it. Because of that, she did have to decide if she would tell Peter. By being in the position she was in, I think it became her right to tell Peter the truth if she felt it was necessary. I think that she ultimately decided to leave it up to Walter, and now she is trying as hard as she can to remove herself from the situation as much as possible. But I don’t think anyone can claim that she is not in the middle of it all.

      Okay, I’m just going to go be silent for a little while… sorry for rambling so much!

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      • Elaine says

        Next time I’m struggling to articulate what I’m thinking, I’m going to add a, “Refer to mlj” comment. :-) You perfectly summed up what I was trying, but failing miserably to say.

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        • mlj102 says

          It’s funny you mention that because I almost didn’t actually submit my comment because I thought, when all was said and done, it was just a much longer version of essentially the same thing you said. The thing is, my comments all tend to be very long and, while that may be good, sometimes I think the same point can be made in a lot less words. I don’t think you failed miserably in any way in what you were saying — I thought you said it all very well. It was simple and to the point. But thank you for the compliment! :)

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  19. LMH says

    mlj102,

    Did you read my thoughts through proximity via this blog? THANK YOU! As John Noble has said (and I’ve repeated b/c I agree w/ it wholeheartedly), this show is ultimately about love. Despite the incredibly intriguing and intricate plot, it is the strong humanistic element in Fringe that seals the deal for me.

    Absolutely amazing episode.

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  20. LMH says

    Ok clear fail with my attempt at html for blockquoting.

    Attempt 2:

    mlj102,

    “The ending: Fringe has had some incredible endings — memorable endings, emotional endings, powerful endings, unexpected endings — but I think this is the first one that truly left me speechless and at a loss for words. The whole time, I seriously had no idea what to expect. I was genuinely curious to find out what Peck was going to do: if he would listen to Walter’s warnings, or if he would go through with his plan to save his fiancee. When the truck hit their car, I was stunned and didn’t know how to react. It was heartbreaking, but at the same time, a brilliant way to resolve everything. And the white tulip at the end was just as powerful. I had been trying to think what he would send Walter, expecting some brief words of wisdom or something along those lines. But the tulip was brilliant and said more than any words could have conveyed. The whole thing was a masterpiece that left me in awe.

    Theme: I’ve mentioned before that I think one of the main themes in Fringe is the power of love and the things people will do for love. From The Same Old Story, when Christopher confessed that, while Dr. Penrose should have let him die, he had kept him alive because he loved him, to Midnight when Nicholas Boone literally gave his life for his wife and posed the question “How far would you go for someone you love?”, to August and his willingness to do something he’d never done before by interfering, and then ultimately to give his own life so that Christine could become important and be allowed to live, to the way love for his family is what motivated Walter to go to the other side to try and cure Peter, and then ultimately keep Peter over here, this theme is abundant in Fringe.

    And this episode continued with all that and emphasized that theme perfectly.”

    It is for that I thank you! ; )

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    • mlj102 says

      LMH:

      :) No worries — I don’t even try using html because I’m pretty positive I would mess it up!

      Thanks for commenting in response to my comment — I always appreciate when people here say that they like what I have to say, and I enjoy the various responses from people — both those who agree with what I say, and those who disagree.

      I really think one of the things that makes Fringe so special and truly enjoyable is that they have this wonderful mix and balance of intriguing stories, powerful themes, and characters that you actually care about. Like you said, the human element in Fringe — the emotion it manages to incorporate — is really what sets Fringe on a level high above pretty much any other TV show I can think of.

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  21. Nicole says

    I would have liked to see the editing happen a little differently in this episode. Yes I believe Walter burning the letter was a bit contrived. But it wouldn’t have been if they had put that scene AFTER he received the white tulip in the mail. It would have left us wondering, WTF is he going to do, will he tell him in person or what? It would have had a lot more emotional weight and left us all screaming at the tv.

    That is the one glaring mistake I have with this episode that I would correct!!

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  22. Betynha says

    I was happy with this episode. The ending was, at least, touching. I had tears in my eyes… Poor Walter!

    Just a point here:
    I’ve read this somewhere, don’t exactly remember where, but it is a interesting point: the number of Peck’s lab was 107 and the seventh episode was “In which we meet Mr. Jones”… Teletransportation there, time travel here… both conceptions far beyond imaginable for any person. I just found it really interesting.

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    • LMH says

      Nice catch! I heard the number 107 and thought it must be a reference or hint but didn’t connect it with anything.

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  23. LMH says

    I actually liked that Walter burned the letter before receiving the Tulip. He loses his nerve while desperately awaiting his sign. Just after this moment that showed significant weakness and personal failure, he gets his sign in an completely inexplicable way (very Godlike) and looks up & toward the upstairs where Peter is.
    Seconds after a moment of abject failure (amplified by Peter’s coming home, the gift of a fixed turn table, yet another refusal to share the secret with Peter & watching the letter burn), he gets what he most desperately needed and hoped for. I feel that the formula of great failure followed by a sign of divine forgiveness and redemption made the scene very powerful for me.

    But that’s just my experience.

    btw there’s a little snow globe on Carol’s (MIT) desk. Intentional or not, reminds me of Nina’s snow globe demonstration of the pauli exclusion principle.

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  24. says

    Does anyone know the name of the music (Title or Artist) which plays on the stereo when Walter enters Peck’s lab? I have been trying to find out for days.

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  25. says

    Does anyone know the name of the music (title or artist) that is playing on the stereo when Walter enters Peck’s lab? I’ve been trying to find out for days.

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  26. says

    One thing about time travel that I’ve never heard explained by it’s proponents is that even if one could move backward in time (or forward, for that matter) how does one land in the desired geographical (on Earth) location, since Earth travels at about 12-15 miles per second (I think) through space? Every fictional story about time travel has the traveler landing in the same location as where he “jumped” from. Should we just take this on faith?

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  27. says

    Yeah, we should just take it on faith the “time-travel” targets the EXACT time + place (that millisecond the Earth is right in rotation).

    This season is shaping up to be as good as the 3rd Season of “Farscape”. If they can make Peter + Olivia earn it and make their love story “epic”. Walter finds redemption finally (i.e. Peter knows + accepts it), then it might, might equal the season that “Farscape” put together (+ the mini-series in which every character reached their climax of personality development).

    (4th season: In the transport while collapsing a wormhole– John: “You know what scares me? From the first moment I laid eyes on you, I could never see the end.” Aeryn: “What scares me is I always could.”)

    If “Fringe” has a moment like that between Peter + Olivia, then “yeah”. If they don’t, bring in another love interest for Olivia + make Peter “her brother”.

    Why is it that only sci-fi shows, which I consider “Fringe” to be, have the best plots? And the best actors? I’m telling you, if I ever made a movie, I would look for actors that have come from sci-fi shows.

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  28. Grimjaw says

    Really nice episode showing that John Noble is a great actor.

    Anyway i was wondering myself if i was the only one that noticed some sparks in the right eye of walter bishop when he is talking about the white tulip… As I couldn’t find any comment on this i’d like to know if i’m hallucinating or not :p ( The sparks appears several time during the conversation around 34:00.) Thank you for answering :p

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  29. MikeMike says

    By peck sending the white tulip he pretty much showed that science is God. He used science to travel back in time and as a result send Walter a letter that was written by a man of science pretending to be a sign from God.

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  30. kittyofdoom says

    That’s one way of interpreting it, MikeMike, but I think there’s also a case to be made that God uses whatever means he wants to effect an outcome. Perhaps in this case he used Alistair Peck.

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  31. Arun says

    (I haven’t read through all the comments, so forgive me if it’s already been said) I noticed that both times when Walter is writing the letter, Peter interrupts on the answering machine. In the ending, because the train incident didn’t happen, Peter didn’t have a reason to call and Walter was allowed to write the entirety of his letter in peace. Perhaps this was why Walter made a different choice, to destroy the letter rather than reveal the truth to his son? That’s my theory. c:

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  32. Tiziano says

    I’m surprised NOBODY here ever released there are some HUGE flaws inherent to the time-travelling.

    When Peck travelled back in the past, into the train, for the SECOND time, why didn’t he meet his “former self” who travelled back in time the VERY FIRST PLACE (into the train)?

    When Peck travelled back in the past, in the green field with the red baloon, why didn’t he meet his “original self” who conceived the time travelling?
    And above all, why did they retrieve Peck’s body and declared him DEAD IF there’s an “original” Peck in the green field still ALIVE?

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    • Oscar says

      There can’t be two versions of the same person (and with “same person” I mean “same person from the same universe”) in the same time/place, so the Peck who jumped instantly replaced the one who originally lived that moment – take it as matter of faith, Tiziano… it’s just a show! ;-)

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  33. -Z- says

    Hello everyone. just wanted to know if im the only one who has noticed that when Walter says to Pecker, “But hes god” theres a flicker of light in his right eye flashing an image of something. can anyone explain this?

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    • jophan says

      It happens now and then in other episodes. I’ve seen discussions indicating that it’s a peculiar side effect of Noble’s past cataract surgery, not a deliberate special effect.

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