Fringe Rewatch: 1.01 Just The Beginning


Fringe Rewatch 1.01

Welcome to the first of our retrospective Fringe rewatch episodes. If you are reading this with your eyes you will know that we are going back..back in time to revisit each of the 43 aired episodes of Fringe. Loaded with fuller perspectives, we bid to uncover new observations and destroy old standing mysteries that are just begging to be resolved.

Wearing only the “black and gray” garments and armed with powers of perception that a Jedi would be proud of, we aim to gain a unique understanding of Fringe before the third season commences on September 23rd.

This first stop on our rewatch tour takes us back to the nearly beginning – an episode we are aptly re-titling “Just The Beginning“, because Peter said so!

New Perspectives

  • How fitting that our story should begin on-board a plane from Germany – what with all the Bishop/Germany ties and David Jones escaping from the Wissenschaft Prison. This is one strand that the writers have kept consistent throughout.
  • Seeing Morgan Steig spew his guts up on that poor stewardess is still one of the sickest Fringe scenes ever. EVER!
  • The mayhem on-board The Plane of Falling Faces was followed by a scene of brief tranquility as we see the auto-piloted plane fly silently through the electrical storm. Such a fantastic transition and a great way to introduce us to the fear and wonder of science.
  • Squeaky Bed Time: It’s so strange to see our girl so happy. All I could think of while watching her bliss were the words of December: “It’s a shame things are about to get so hard for her”.
  • Watching Olivia throughout this episode I kept wondering: “What’s Altlivia up to on her side?”. Because even though so much weird crap happened in this episode, things still seem so ‘normal’ at this point. “So you can question a dead man can you, Nina? Pfft, I’ve seen Molebabies and a parallel earth!”. This episode really does cross that line – after this, there was literally no going back.
  • That damned flickering light above Olivia and John by the rubbish bins. I always thought that it was an intentional marker or just something intriguing the creators thought they’d throw in for ‘atmosphere’. I’d probably stand by either of those possibilities, although I like to think it was the former – an indicator of Olivia’s ability. She had just told Scotty boy that she loved him – emotions were high, and we know all about Olivia and her emotions.
  • Olivia looked almost dead as they wheeled her into the hospital. In fact, this scene contains some rather unusual editing effects for Fringe, including almost dream-like scene where the doctor updates Olivia on John’s condition. It was a blend of states, you could say. Was this an early indicator as to the relationship between dreams, memories and reality, or just a cool effect? Probably the latter.
  • Being inside St. Claire’s sure made ‘Peter The Powerful’ uncomfortable. I wonder if this wasn’t so much due to his distaste for Walter, but because of the trauma that his mom went through? I’m not certain that the writers knew exactly what story they were going to concoct for Elizabeth at this stage, but they probably would have had an idea that it would involve her mental state.
  • Still one of my favorite scenes EVER is Olivia and Walter meeting for the ‘first time’. I love Walter’s rather knowing comment about someone coming for him “eventually”. I adore the gradual close-ups on their faces. And there’s just something so powerful about Walter having his back to Olivia as she stands like a bunny rabbit at the door. Seriously, this is a scene that actually grows with time.
  • Just think – so much of what we see of Walter in this episode (and subsequent) is the result of him asking William Bell to remove his memories. I find that retrospectively powerful and engaging.
  • It’s noticeable just how far to the edge Olivia was pushed by the circumstances. Just a few examples: allowing a trembling Walter to stick his knife into John, agreeing to go into the Bra & Panties Tank, leaping from rooftops onto stairwells without looking or breaking pace. I’ve said this before, and I’ll say it again: AmaaaaaaaaaZING!
  • Ahhhh, I can’t tell you how good it felt to see Broyles in an actual office that doesn’t resemble a dungeon. Good times, folks, good times! :)

  • Did I detect a bit of Eye Sexin’ between Olivia and Peter at the Lab? Nah! It must just be my imagination – nothing will come of it. Thanks God!
  • Olivia is incredible. Against all the odds she achieved the impossible by saving John. Ok, so he died in the end, but she brought Walter and Peter together, got Broyles to like her, and got a new job!
  • Walter talks about the synaptic transfer and the sharing of information across the unconscious state. I wonder, could a similar technique work across realities?
  • Livvy’s ultimate reasoning for entering the Bra & Panties Tank? “John would do it for me!”. Cool, but hopefully not wearing bra and panties! :/
  • Behold the editing error. (A couple of folks emailed me about this so I just wanted to reiterate that it is unlikely to be a clue): We see hands entering the tank to pull Olivia out before Peter and Walter have even opened the door. We could, if we were feeling generous, put this down as a time-shift clue of some sort, but I think it was just an oversight.
  • Was it just me, or did part of Olivia’s dreamstate ‘wasteland’ resemble The Blight? Probably just coincidence – a construct of how Olivia perceived her fusion with John’s consciousness.
  • Walter sees his St. Claire’s incarceration as ‘punishment’, which is in-keeping with his later realization of God and his search for redemption. It may also inform us as to why he asked Bell to remove certain parts of his memory.
  • What’s with the cat in the window?
  • Olivia says that her and John “owe each other” – giving us a glimmer into what her life might have been like before John. In other words, being with John was probably a momentary bright spot in an otherwise bleak existence – helping to corroborate what we have since come to know about her childhood.
  • I’ve heard it claimed (and at one point I may have said this myself) that John tried to kill Olivia by running her off the road. I don’t think this was the case – I think he was just trying to shake her off, not murder her.
  • The events in this episode not only brought Walter’s son back to him, but it reminded him of what it’s like to have people trust him. Aw, Walter I trust you. (about as far as I could throw you).

Mysteries & Answers

  • Did John Scott know that Olivia was “special”?
  • My Opinion: I’ve gone back and forth on this a few times, but I think we have to say that, yes, he did. For one thing, the fact that he KNEW that Broyles sent Olivia to the storage facility for a REASON implies that John knew more about Olivia than he ever let on.
  • Which ties in nicely with: Why did Broyles send Olivia to that damned storage facility?
  • My Opinion: I actually came to the same conclusion last year – Broyles either knew that Olivia was “special”, or he knew that she had past connections with William Bell and was a test subject in his clinical trials. Broyles probably wanted to get to the bottom of “The Pattern” and so decided to test Olivia – to put her on the trail to see if she came up with the goods – and to his surprise and wonder, she DID. I’m not sure how much information the producers and directors gave Lance Reddick on how to portray those moments, but it seems obvious that he nailed it. A lot of what we see with Broyles is a feigned lack of knowledge, but there are moments when he lets his guard slip: “I know exactly who you are!”, being one such pointer (and yes, I know that he may have purely been referring to the whole Sanford thing, but there are other examples). Now, I’m not suggesting that Broyles knew, or even knows, everything – clearly there are things that have shocked him along the way, but suffice to say he knew about Olivia’s past (to an extent) and has become very protective of her. That’s the interpretation that makes most sense to me anyway.

Outstanding Mysteries

Fringe Rewatch 1.01

  • How did Steig know that his brother would use his diabetic pen? His whole ‘demonstration’ depended on it. Perhaps he knew that Morgan needed to dose himself every few hours? (although I do wonder whether the electrical storm was somehow man-made – ensuring that Morgan’s anxiety would require him to administer the spiked insulin? That’s probably an unnecessary plot twist though).
  • Nina said that she started working for Bell “16 years ago” (as of September 2008) – which would make it the year that he started BellMedics. Although I had assumed she was working for him at the time of Peter’s death in 1985, although perhaps that wasn’t in an official capacity.
  • What does the streaming “which must not be bought” text on the window of Massive Dynamic mean, if anything?

New Clues & Observations

  • While in the Lab, John Scott’s body is situated under an arch. Arches traditionally symbolise a bridge or doorway to the beyond – a gateway from one place to another. For me, this is an obvious allusion to the different levels of consciousness (as seen in the episode where Olivia communicates with a comatose John Scott) and a very early hint (intentional or otherwise) to the alternate reality storyline.
  • The yellow and red doors at the storage facility. Could this be an early representation of the alternate universe color thematics?

Possible Retcons

“Retcon” = Retroactive Continuity: Adding or altering information to the backstory of a fictional character or world, without invalidating previously established facts.

  • Peter to Olivia: “Sweetheart, we all care about someone who’s dying”. I think this may have originally been intended to be a reference to Peter’s mother. As I mentioned a bit earlier, I’m not sure that the writers had fully planned out what they wanted to do with Elizabeth, but they must have had an idea. It’s possible that at this stage the writers had Peter’s mom down as being alive but very sick – giving Peter added incentive to adopt the kind of lifestyle that he had been living prior to Olivia coming into the equation. Or perhaps Peter was speaking in general sense, but with his mother in mind.
  • Charlie’s motives: I still believe that in the early episodes the writers left Charlie’s character open to be a traitor. There’s subtle evidence in the Pilot (and subsequent episodes) with those lingering after-discussion stares. Again, not a major alteration, more a case of portraying the character with enough ambiguity, just in case.
  • The Pattern. Personally I think we haven’t seen the last of it (and may even have seen more of it in season 2 than we realized), but the consistency of this storyline is definitely up for debate.

Theme Tracker

“Theme Tracker” will track themes of interest so that we can see how they spawned, where they led and where they may lead.

God:

  • Walter telling Olivia and Peter that aside from Bellie, “God” also had access to his work.
  • Richard Steig, sarcastically: “I swear to God”.

Dreams & Sleep:

  • Peter to Walter (re: the Lab): “Wake up, it’s gone”.
  • Walter to Peter: “You woke me up again. You can’t put me back to sleep”.
  • Olivia and Broyles discussion: “I just want to go back to before”. “Dunham. I don’t think you can”.
  • John Scott thought the synaptic transfer with Olivia was a “dream” – interesting.

Quote Terrific

  • “So much happened here..and so much is about to”

Best Retrospective Performance: Anna Torv – the eyes are so expressive without ever going over the top. Brilliant Fringe debut.

Favorite Retrospective Moment: I don’t have to tell you that it was Olivia leaping across rooftops, because you probably already know.

Retrospective Rating: 8.5/10 – surprisingly very rewatchable.

Useful Links:

Next Rewatch episode: 1.02 The Same Old Story – July 22nd, 2010.

If you have any thoughts on the above rewatch post, or your own rewatch opinions that you’d like to share, feel free to dive in below.

Comments

  1. says

    Picture of Olivia and John. See the yellow light above Olivia.
    I hinted about this before many times, and since you’re (we’re) rewatching episodes, i think it is a clue to watch for in every episode.

    I have seen many scenes with Olivia and a yellow light above or behind her, but i didn’t write them down sofar. This, however, is #1.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  2. Laura says

    “Did I detect a bit of Eye Sexin’ between Olivia and Peter at the Lab? Nah! It must just be my imagination.”
    Actually I always thought it was love at first sight, at least for Peter.
    Well, sort of. I noticed it when Peter looked at Olivia just before she enters in the tank. It must just be my imagination, too. ;)

    Like: Thumb up 1

    • Jennifer says

      I agree & I think it was for her also. I think it surprised her because she had never been in that situation where it was love at first sight but it was like she was on a mission to save her partner or just a human life. Because if you go back & watch her looks to Peter, it started when they were on the plane flying back from Iraq & then on. You could see that from that moment on, she trusted him. She talked to him better than she did anyone else.

      Like: Thumb up 0

  3. Laura says

    @ Obsever: I do have something for your yellow theory:
    the three fundamental colours of the visible spectrum are blue, red, and..yellow. This may support your idea of three universes involved rather than “just” two.You known, theories.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  4. Anjali says

    “That damned flickering light above Olivia and John by the rubbish bins.”

    Wasn’t that in morse code???

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • says

      Anjali,

      Hmm, now that you mention it, I remember some discussion on this when the episode first aired. Can’t remember whether it was ever confirmed as morse code or not. It might be worth dusting off my old morse code kit. (if I had one).

      Like: Thumb up 0

  5. fedorafadares says

    Olivia leaping across rooftops, jumping off buildings, even the explosion at the storage facility that threw her back against trailers…

    Olivia has seemed to come back from the brink of death/survive physical injuries others wouldn’t have many, many times, starting with the Pilot.

    Is this part of her ability? Are her molecules somehow closer together than most people’s, allowing her body to be stronger to withstand physical trauma and also keep her atoms from splitting apart/becoming unstable while crossing dimensions?

    Is this the “natural” ability that Walter and Bell have referred to?

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • ApplesBananasRhinoceros says

      In Brown Betty, the wound Olivia had from the quantum laser healed very quickly in front of Astrid’s eyes, so I think they (the writers? Walter?) are hinting that she has a super healing quality.

      Like: Thumb up 0

    • says

      fedora,

      Indeed – she always was the strong one.

      I like your suggestion about her molecules – making her the inverse of what Bellie ultimately became.

      Olivia’s ‘predisposition’ is perhaps one of the most intriguing areas of exploration. What is it that made young Olive such a suitable candidate? Was it her natural emotional propensity, or something else….

      Like: Thumb up 0

  6. LizW65 says

    A few things:
    The word “Zeno” on Olivia’s uncle’s kayak: Zeno was an ancient Greek philosopher, and the founder of Stoicism. A nod to Olivia’s stoic personality? Someone on another site also stated that he was the first to posit the existence of parallel universes, but I can’t find a source for this; it may just be wishful thinking.

    Nina Sharp’s unusual interest in Olivia–is it just that she knows of the Cortexiphan trials, or something more? At one point she says something to the effect of, “I’m telling you this as I’d tell my own daughter…” which I thought nothing of the first time I heard it, but later it got me wondering if there might be more to the relationship than Nina’s letting on.

    Possible retcon: Roco mentions that Charlie was played sufficiently ambiguously to be set up as a possible villain. I think at that early stage of the game, the same could be said for almost any of the characters, Peter in particular, but also Broyles or Astrid or even Olivia herself. It’s fun to speculate just how much of the main mythology of the show was actually planned out in advance and how much was left open to development and interpretation, and how much the actors were told about their characters at that point.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  7. LBJ says

    I’ve always wondered about the “He’s not dead” gravestone in Olivia’s dreamscape. My new theory is that it hints at Robert Bishop, who we’ve so far only seen on a gravestone. Maybe he is alive and kept young like the other Nazi guy.

    Also, I’ve heard that the sign on the tank, that goes something like “watch your hands, heavy doors, close with care, save your fingers” is actually an anagram, with words like “faith vs science,” “technology wars,” and “you’re ready,” although I haven’t tried it myself.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • Dani says

      I’ve always thought the “He’s not dead” gravestone was somehow related to the “He is here” graffiti in the parallel world. Robert Bishop would be a good one, considering the dates of his death have to be wrong – he seems to have died two years before Walter was born. That and Walter told Peter that Peter would’ve liked Robert.

      Like: Thumb up 1

  8. Con says

    I think that Broyles and Nina (both of them with some knowledge about Cortexiphan and the coming war) worked together to get Olivia involved in investigating the Pattern. Of course, after they succeeded they still fought over her for a while, like when Nina continued to offer Olivia jobs at Massive Dynamic.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • Gil_Cdn says

      Broyles and Nina are definitely up to something …. wait till you re-watch the scene after the opening theme of the next episode (ep.1.02 Same Old Story) and tell me what you think about that round table meeting where Broyles “introduce his ‘new’ team” to the ‘Oversight Committee’ where Nina Sharp is one of the member. Nina seems to be against the make up of this NEW Fringe team and questioned everyone that Broyles has recruited: Walter, Peter & Olivia …. (very similiar to Sanford Harris speech to a hand-cuffed Olivia at Boston General Hospital)

      If Broyles and Nina in ep.1.01 did not confuse you enough, try making some sense out of this peculiar meeting in ep.1.02 and let me know what you think!

      Like: Thumb up 0

  9. Elaine says

    Roco, I can’t tell you how excited I’ve been all weekend anticipating your re-cap of the pilot. I decided to approach this re-watch giving specific attention to Broyles knowledge of the government and military’s interest in the Fringe division–and how it relates to Olivia as well as the rest of team. You addressed my exact thoughts regarding John’s comment to Olivia about why Broyles sent Olivia to the storage units, and why he asked her to come and work for him. I’ve felt for a while that Broyles always knew Olivia was tested with Cortexiphan, which given his and Nina’s clandestine meeting after James Heath was located, along with their secret to help train the other children they located to control their abilities…finding them has been a part of his job. I also feel he was aware that John Scott was black ops. He may not have known exactly who were his contacts, or who had tasked him to work that deep undercover, but I believe he was aware that he was working “Pattern” related cases.

    I’m at work, so, I’ll have to get into this a little more later.

    One other thing, the symbolism was really stunning in this episode. I also had a similar thought about the arch they placed John Scott under as well as the archs in the ceiling as Olivia prayerfully (that’s the way it came across to me) waits to see if the treatment Walter and Peter came up with will work. This is also where she’s confronte by Broyles with a greater, scarier truth behind what she was investigating. A challenge to her unknown faith, perhaps? Made me think of Olivia giving Ella the cross that her mother gave her when she was a child to keep her safe.

    More later.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • SF says

      The arches in the ceiling above Olivia while she waits, are similar to the arches in the opera house or theatre when the cortexitots with Walter move (what word should we use? transport?) themselves to the other side. So maybe another continuity link in her faith, you’re right, or maybe how her consciousness is expanding. I just noticed the arches above her head in this rewatch.

      Like: Thumb up 0

    • says

      Nice thoughts Elaine.

      I like the way you put this: “scarier truth behind what she was investigating”.

      It’s as if the fabric that was hiding that ‘truth’ from her was suddenly revealed – and although it terrified Dunham, she was compelled to follow the trail, wherever it led her. Funny how it led her back to herself.

      It’s quite something to see just how far Agent Olivia of Dunham has come since those first cracks were applied to her slumber.

      Her reality will never be the same. :o

      Like: Thumb up 0

  10. Karo says

    Quote: “That damned flickering light above Olivia and John by the rubbish bins.”

    Maybe Olivia was unintentionnally trying to shut it out (and failing), her ability being trigger by love :p

    I guess we’ll never know, but i’m pretty sure it’s just a random cool effect :)

    Like: Thumb up 0

  11. LMH says

    I thought the flickering light was just for atmosphere, but who knows. It was a great pilot, and while I was really unsure about where the show was going when I first saw it, I was completely won over by Anna Torv’s portrayal of Olivia. I thought what an impressive character. That, combined with the other actors and the sky-high production quality, sold me on Fringe. I might just have to watch it again (probably the 4th time?).

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • Gil_Cdn says

      Mind you, I’ve heard through the grapevine that the production budget for this Pilot episode is 10 million; and each subsequent Season 1 episode has a buget of 4 million ….. we can obviously see it in the set, special effects and the scene of this pilot episode ….. I guess $$$$ really makes magic in the TV business.

      Like: Thumb up 0

  12. says

    @LBJ Perhaps the He’s not dead gravestone could hint at the alter-John not being dead. I think Roco questioned in one of his reviews what would happen if Olivia happened upon Alter-John in the alternate universe. I’m curious about this also!

    Like: Thumb up 0

  13. Inter-dimensional Dave says

    One of my favorite themes from Fringe is “dreams and sleep”. So I’m glad to see Roco touch upon this in his re-watch. Having seen “Inception” this past Friday I’d say there is a new contender to the title of heavyweight dream champ. Chris Nolan and his crew is definitely giving Abrams and his team a run for their money.

    At first blush I would say the major difference between the two camps is the Fringe folk seem to think that dreams allow you to gain perspective on reality. While Nolans group blurs the lines between the two states where they are nearly indistinguishable. So when Olivia laments, “I just want to go back to before” an “Inception” Broyles would answer, “so why don’t you?”

    Or is there really a differnce? Maybe I will sleep on it.

    Either way Fringe fans will love “Inception” I heartily recommend it.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • Anjali says

      Loved ‘Inception’. Brilliant!!!
      Regarding Roco’s question: “Walter talks about the synaptic transfer and the sharing of information across the unconscious state. I wonder, could a similar technique work across realities?” —> I have a very STRONG feeling that it’s possible!

      Like: Thumb up 0

    • ApplesBananasRhinoceros says

      i also saw some intangible parallels between Inception & Fringe (I LOVED Inception!!). I’m a big believer that Fringe is somehow tied to the dream state of one or more of the characters, not that it’s all a dream per se, but maybe one of the realities/universes is influenced in some way or another by one or more of the characters. I can’t help but think all the episodes that have ‘dream’ in the title are very significant. What exists in the Fringe world? What is reality? Is reality objective or subjective? Do the alter characters influence their opposite side doppelgangers in some way? I hope they go into this more in S3!!

      Like: Thumb up 0

      • Elaine says

        “I’m a big believer that Fringe is somehow tied to the dream state of one or more of the characters, not that it’s all a dream per se, but maybe one of the realities/universes is influenced in some way or another by one or more of the characters.”

        This.

        After ‘Johari Window’, and the pre-S3 promo of ‘Perception is Reality’ that came out the other week, I’m beginning to believe that perhaps our Olivia and Peter as well posseses the ability to alter perception or the reality around them. Perhaps not in the same way or magnitude that it’s portrayed in ‘Inception’ (can’t wait to see that movie, btw) by affecting elements (like electricity) to bend reality in some manner. If that makes any sense.

        Like: Thumb up 0

        • Inter-dimensional Dave says

          Elaine, I think you are on to something that Roco alluded to above and I’ve struggled to make sense of myself. Can, let’s say Olivia, act on her reality or the other dimension’s by tapping into her subconscious or through some dream state. Or, simply put, manipulation through observation. It’s one of the basic tenets of science that the mere observation of an experiment alters it’s outcome. With Olivia’s “talent” it could be with an atypical or altered state.

          See the movie, “Forbidden Planet” for the subconscious acting on the material or real world. See the movie, “Altered States” for that matter and enjoy “Inception”! (Tip, as they said in the Matrix,”free your mind.”)

          Like: Thumb up 0

          • SF says

            I can hardly wait to see Inception! have to get a babysitter first…..since how Fringe uses and explores dreams is one of the reasons why I love this show so very much, I’m glad to see dreams brought up again here. I had a terrible moment when Olivia is coming too, from the explosion, and the screen goes white for a moment, and I thought, what if she’s dreaming? and all of Fringe is a dream? then I couldn’t stand that thought any more, so it has made me wonder why. I think if Olivia were dreaming the whole thing would lessen Fringe’s impact as a whole. Did anyone else think that, have a moment when they wondered what was going on?

            Or, that moment when the screen goes blank, is that when she uses her cortexiphan to live, and so she really can’t go back to how things were because she is already changed? The doctor said she should have been injured more, but she wasn’t. That the explosion of the Pattern event ripped across her consciousness then? Just some thoughts after this episode and thinking about reality vs dreams in Fringe.

            Like: Thumb up 0

            • fedorafadares says

              I hate to have those thoughts, but I’ve thought them, too. I love M. Night Shamalaya (sp?), but not for “Fringe,” please.

              Like: Thumb up 0

            • ApplesBananasRhinoceros says

              SF, maybe because Olivia’s had so much experience from a little child letting the universe “pass through her” that her molecules are more stable and can find their way back to themselves??

              I’ve had so many moments in the Fringeverse where I’ve wondered if they are *finally* going to wake up from this dream!! But they never do.
              I also can’t stand the thought that Fringe is entirely a dream, some of it has to be real… right??? RIGHT??!!!?!?

              Like: Thumb up 0

              • SF says

                fedorafadares and ApplesBananasRhinoceros: I am so glad I’m not the only one who’s had this thought! Thank you!! Some of Fringe if not most of it has to be real. But that’s how Fringe plays with our perceptions, I think. Darn, writing about this makes me think about NWP, the episode I have the most trouble with!

                I do like how you say that Olivia’s experience as a child learning to let the universe pass through her has made her molecules more stable. Would you say too that cortexiphan has strengthened her molecules too, so she won’t fly apart one day like Bell (and presumably most others who pass back and forth) did? That’s what I think.

                So if Fringe is about the power of dreams too to tell the truth, what about Olivia’s sleeplessness as the truth is revealed to her about her past? Do you think she is afraid to sleep because she will remember her childhood then? Even though she wants to consciously, I think there is a huge block in her mind also, something she is deeply afraid of remembering, so she has no memories of then. What could she be so afraid of, that roars in her visions in Jacksonville and threatens her so? Something about her abilities,is my guess, or something about what happened in Jacksonville. I’m going to be very interested to see if she sleeps more in S3 :-) then again, locked in that chamber, she may never truly sleep again.

                Like: Thumb up 0

  14. Jodie says

    Am I the only one who doesn’t think that Steig was actually fired from Massive Dynamics? This was the first reference to technology that was “stolen” from Massive Dynamics and then used by various individuals in nefarious ways. Was Steig following Nina Sharp’s orders. I think that there is evidence later on that implies that Scott was investigating Massive Dynamics. Did Nina know this? I wonder if Steig was under orders to kill John Scott. It is just too convenient that his experiments led Olivia directly to Walter’s work which in turn brought Peter back to Boston. I think that Elaine is right about Broyles knowing about Olivia’s specialness, and given Broyles close connection to Nina, it all just seems too orchestrated. I’m not saying that Broyles intended for Scott to be hurt, but I too think that Broyles knew that Scott was black ops, and I wonder how well informed he kept Nina at that point. Did she suggest that he use Scott more in Pattern events? Broyles and Nins seemed to be much more cozy earlier on in Season One than later in Season Two. I think that Broyles began to distrust Nina in Season Two.

    I guess that I’m kind of rambling here, but I’ve often wondered just how it was that our little threesome all came together. I’ve had the feeling, for a while now, that Nina has been pulling the strings behind the scenes. And now that we know how important Peter really is, was it Peter that was needed to get Walter out of St. Claire’s or was it Walter that was needed to get Peter back in Boston? I think that Broyles was testing Olivia hoping that she would work out and be assigned permanently to his team. Even if Scott hadn’t been hurt in this particular Pattern event, it was only a matter of time before Olivia would come across another Pattern event that would lead to Walter’s past research, which would in turn bring Peter and Walter onto the team.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • Elaine says

      I’m glad you bring up the point about Richard Steig and Nina Sharp, because the thought that perhaps like the manuevering Nina did in ‘Of Human Action’, she either used Steig (and his ambitions) or was in cohoots with him to smoke out whomever was investigating ‘MD’ in connection to ‘Pattern’ related incidents. I’m not entirely clear, but given that we later discover that MD was attempting to download the information on the glass disk John Scott had embedded in his hand, she, too, was aware of Scotts black ops status. But like Broyles wasn’t aware of who had tasked him…or all that he knew at the time of his death. Either way, I definitely think Nina’s and perhaps Broyles to a lesser degree has been working behind the scenes to bring our weird little family unit together with some intended and unintended results.

      Also, and I’m likely way off base here, but did anyone else notice the inside of the room they wheel Scott’s body in to? I could swear the machinery looked an awful lot like the wavelink machine Bell built or helped to build with Walternate on the other side.

      Like: Thumb up 0

  15. number six says

    A few things, after yet another rewatch:

    I can’t get into John Scott’s story, no matter how hard I try. For me, he was the weakest part of S1 and although I appreciate that Olivia had a significant relationship, when I think about this after watching both seasons, it seems she has this tendency to fall for her working partners: John Scott, Lucas Vogel and now Peter. This makes me a bit uneasy somehow. If the writers decide Peter and her don’t belong together and decide to give her another love interest in the form of a new FBI agent, I wouldn’t find it out of character.

    Olivia. I liked how she blackmailed Peter into helping her. Anna Torv’s acting during the crying scene was very well done and realistic. As for the eye-sex, I have no problem with it on Peter’s part, since he wasn’t in any romantic relationship, but I dislike it on her. I am supposed to buy her undying love for her boyfriend, but there she was, looking like she was irresistibly attracted to a stranger. The rest, I could leave or take.

    Peter. Maybe too cocky? I liked him from the beginning, but I’m glad he dropped the “sweetheart” soon enough. I also like that his anger towards his father showed, but it didn’t prevent him from being helpful.

    Walter. I was sold the moment he greeted his son. For me, John Noble was the best part of the pilot by far. I love how he manipulated Olivia into giving him, what he wanted. He might be crazy, but he’s a genius after all.

    As for the secondary characters, I found Nina fascinating, Astrid too cute and Charlie likable enough. I really disliked Broyles, but that changed soon enough with the following episodes.

    In my opinion, this episode and the characters suffered from “pilotitis”, but it did pique my interest enough to keep watching. And I am glad I did, because I think this is a very fine show.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • Maggie says

      oh yes. I was soooo glad when John died…how sad is that? an hour or so oh John’s character and I liked that he died! I was kinda upset when they made him out to actually really be a good guy. I mean, i get it in terms of the plot and im fine with it…but, yeah. I agree, too…I guess thoes are the only people she ever gets close to, like at all. I mean, she doesnt have any friends, right? (other than her sister…)

      I dunno…i think the ‘goggley eyes’ bit was good. cause I think that they were meant to be together. And not just in the cute whatever sorta way–but actually in terms of the Fringe-ness….yakno? (I dunno if that makes sense). good forshadowing, i guess.

      Like: Thumb up 0

      • number six says

        I wasn’t glad that John died in the pilot, but, since I wasn’t invested in Olivia as a character yet, I wasn’t sad, either. He did bug me, when he reappeared later, though, as I found this character boring at best and annoying at worst. Retconning him into being a good guy was just unbelievable to me, but it made Olivia happy and gave her closure, so I don’t mind that much. I just wish they had wrapped up that story line withing 1 or 2 episodes, instead of taking up 1 season and a half, which didn’t do Olivia any favors as a character in my view.

        When I said I disliked the eye-sexing on her part, I meant it in terms of being sold on her love for John. I can understand that she felt a strong attraction for Peter, but under those circumstances, I wish she had been more subtle. I just cannot buy an “undying love” story, when one of the partners is showing such strong attraction for another person.

        Like: Thumb up 0

        • LizW65 says

          I believe John Scott was meant to be what TV Tropes calls a “decoy protagonist”–that is, he was built up to appear to be the hero in the first part of the story, only to be killed off and replaced by the far less conventionally heroic Bishops. (This, apparently, is what Bad Robot had intended to do with the main character on Lost, but the network executives made them keep him on as a continuing character.)
          Some time ago, I read an amusing post on another TV discussion site to the effect of “I couldn’t get past the first few minutes of Fringe because the leads had zero chemistry”–apparently the poster had given up on the show without realizing that John Scott didn’t survive the Pilot episode.:D

          Like: Thumb up 0

          • number six says

            Well, that’s interesting. Thank you!

            They did have zero chemistry, but that poster in that discussion site should have had a little patience.

            Like: Thumb up 0

  16. says

    I like this show so much, but after rewatch the first episode I love it!. Why?, because I realize that:

    1) Charlie’s monologue, talking to Olivia at the car after John’s death is almost the same Alt-Charlie does in season three finale! : “job isn’t what it was 10 years ago…, the truth is we’re obsolet…”

    2) I’m not sure 100%, but i think Nina’s assistant is the same actress who plays Bell’s assistant in season one finale. In both scenes she comes with Olivia until Nina’s/Bell’s office.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • Pwnsauce says

      good catch! i went back and compared, and like you, i’m pretty positive that they are the same. i never noticed that.

      Like: Thumb up 0

    • Maggie says

      okay, what I noticed about this in my re-watch was this:

      Episode 1:01–conversation with charlie in the car. followed by Olivia having a conversation with peter in which she she said somthing along the lines of “100 reasons” (or thereabouts)

      episode 2:20–SAME THING!

      (which I found interesting. and awesome. regardless if it was done intentionally/specifically or not).

      Like: Thumb up 0

      • says

        Oh, it was definitely intentional. :)

        We posted some more about it here if you want a deeper look. The level of symmetry is one of the great things about the show – illustrating how moments can bleed across time and reality. Great catch with the Olivia and Peter symmetry in the following scenes.

        Like: Thumb up 0

  17. italianstalian says

    these are all great ideas but I think I just found another clue. I got my season 1 DVD out to rewatch the pilot and noticed the glyphs on the front of it aswell as our 3 main characters. the hologram behind Walters face is the seahorse glyph, which we already know is a reference to Walters father and the bishop family. but behind oliva is. a frog with some type of symbol on it’s back and behind peter is a leaf with a triangle, which we saw in massive dynamic. i don’t know what these symbols mean in relation to dunham and Peter but it’s another question un answered.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • Maggie says

      Yes. I find this interesting, too. the way I see it, however, is not only a connection to the image itself (seahouse, frog, leaf) but also the Fringe-esqueness of it (golden/fibonacci spiral, golden ratio, delta). I am working out a theory about all this. the hard part was always Peter’s Delta Leaf. but I think there is a ‘clue’ in the fact that it is a symbol at MD.

      I had a thought the other night, though, that his is the leaf because of the whole blight thing and that, maybe, it was not simply that walter opened a door that caused the blight and all that bad stuff over there–but rather, that he opened a door and TOOK PETER, whom, as we know, is important/special. So, as I see it…its Peter’s…shall we say…(special)energy-ness that some how had an effect on thier enviroment, too. Because Delta is the symbol for change. I remember using it mostly in chem. to note changes in energy/heat.

      As for Olivia…I think that one is much more obvious. The Frog because she found thoes Frogs through Johns memory. That was the episode where she discovered that he wasnt a trator, right? Well, maybe there is somthing in that-closure? I dunno. But i just figured it had to do with that case. As for the symbol–its the Golden Ratio. I dont really understand all that math of it…but the way I see it…it is, in terms of it being used here, the perfect ratio/complete balance. Olivia’s not perfect, but somehow in terms of all this fringe stuff SHE is the right one for the job–along with Walter and Peter. Furthermore, the golden ratio is connected to the golden (fibonacci) spiral on the seahorse, which DOES have a connection to Walter, too. He likes the Fibonacci Sequence and, from what I understand, the dimensions/floor plans of the lab are OF the golden spiral.

      Im not really sure if it all makes sense…Its not a perfectly detailed analysis but it is something I have been thinking about time and again since the DVDs came out.

      Like: Thumb up 0

      • fedorafadares says

        Not only that, but frogs are a symbol of fertility and the “phi” on its back represents the Golden Ratio — which represents beauty in art and nature. (The ratio of Marilyn Monroe’s waist size to hip size was “phi.” So are ratio of features of the “Mona Lisa” face. Things generally considered beautiful often contain a 1.618 ratio somewhere.)

        Leaves symbolize healing and its “delta” denotes change. The seahorse represents fathering.

        Like: Thumb up 0

  18. Helena says

    “Behold the editing error. (A couple of folks emailed me about this so I just wanted to reiterate that it is unlikely to be a clue): We see hands entering the tank to pull Olivia out before Peter and Walter have even opened the door. We could, if we were feeling generous, put this down as a time-shift clue of some sort, but I think it was just an oversight.”

    This also happens in the interrogation scene. On the screens behind Walter, Peter is already inside, but we see him coming in moments later. Two editing errors in one episode?

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • says

      Helena,

      Very true. Perhaps we should add another: If I recall, there are also some continuity ‘errors’ with the clocks at the FBI building (when Olivia informs Broyles of her Bishop discovery) mysteriously changing their synchronicity. Hmm..

      Like: Thumb up 0

  19. Paulina says

    I re-watched this a few weeks ago. Thanks for amazing observations as always. I especially liked the ones about how we start with a plane from Germany (never thought about that before) and also about the arch above John Scott’s body…very visually symbolic you’re right I think.

    The pilot is an episode that I thought was alright on my first watch and still wasn’t too impressed with on my second watch but on my third watch I was awed by the subtlety in acting by everyone. I do think Peter was supposed to be thinking about his mother in the “Sweetheart, we all care about someone who’s dying” line.

    And Olivia IS incredible. In my rewatch, I was struck by just how much I LOVE her asking to be part of the group that goes on the plane. “That’s not redundancy, that’s accountability.” She’s SO efficient and badass, I love her.

    I was also struck by how the Fringe team was able to start working together pretty effectively/efficiently from the get-go. With Astrid just going with it and writing down all the stuff that was needed and getting it. Olivia doing her best to follow Walter’s rambles and trusting him and Peter trying to be the voice of reason (verging on cynicism) but when it comes down to it he’ll help in any way that he can. And him and Walter thinking up/saying the same thing at the same time at the end there and Walter giving him an A+. They are SO cool.

    Walter to Peter: “You woke me up again. You can’t put me back to sleep”.

    Yes, I love this line. It’s a very nice parallel to what Nick Lane says about what you wake up can’t be put to sleep.

    Also, interesting when we think about how much Olivia repressed about her childhood. & the whole thing about being “activated” and such.

    And I just love how the Pilot is this wake-up call for everyone really. Walter out of the hospital and having people trust and listen to him again. Peter back in Boston and having to stay in one place and confront his father, his past. And Olivia not able to go back to “before” and having to revisit her relationship with John.

    I was also really struck this time by how Walter check’s Peter pupils first of all things. I guess as foreshadowing of Peter’s illness and true origins.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  20. Paulina says

    Oh and a couple things about Peter and Olivia’s first meeting:

    The first couple times I watched the Pilot I just accepted that Olivia was able to con Peter because, as she said, anyone could see that he was desperate (and hey, maybe he was thrown off by a pretty face). It wasn’t until my latest rewatch that I was wondering if there is more to it than that. Peter mentions that his thing is being able to read people, and I wonder if yeah he’s just good at reading people or maybe it’s supposed to be a special “ability” of his? And Olivia’s own abilities were able to shield her from his and thus her being able to con the con artist. But who knows, I’m speculating.

    Either way, it seems Peter met his match in Olivia Dunham from the very beginning.

    Also, their first meeting goes in nicely with Walter’s statement in The Bishop Revival that Olivia is “someone who can see right through [Peter].” :)

    And it’s interesting how Peter is first presented as this con man with no ties or loyalty to family or country it seems but — after Olivia’s initial blackmail of him — he’s right there with her helping out in any way he can (like the way he interrogated Steig) and not turning his back on her at the end of the Pilot. Maybe he just saw how desperate Olivia was and felt bad for her and compelled to her, maybe there was always going to be that special connection where Olivia would need Peter by her side, maybe it’s just because underneath it all Peter is a caring and nurturing person.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  21. mlj102 says

    I was so excited to see the Pilot rewatch had been posted and I was equally as excited to see that there were already so many comments responding to it. There have been some really great things pointed out and people have suggested some fascinating theories. It just goes to show that there’s always more to uncover, and our perception of the events in one episode will change based on what happens in later episodes. I love it!

    “It’s so strange to see our girl so happy.”

    I thought the same thing during my rewatch of the Pilot. It’s not that the character was so different — she was still the same determined, professional, amazing FBI agent that we know now — but we were just seeing a different side of her, which is interesting. It surprised me to see her so happy and calm and almost carefree at times during the episode since that is such a contrast to the person she has become as a result of her work. And they did an excellent job in showing the progression of her character through the course of the episode as events happened and her world essentially fell apart around her and she “woke up” to the reality of these events taking place and became aware of things she hadn’t even considered before. It’s really a contrast to the broken, haunted person she has become. She still has moments of happiness, but you can see how the full nature of her work constantly weighs on her.

    “That damned flickering light above Olivia and John by the rubbish bins…although I like to think it was the former – an indicator of Olivia’s ability.”

    Seriously, that light stands out to me every time I watch this episode. It seems too deliberate to be unimportant, yet I have no idea what the significance could be. And that bugs me. I don’t know if we’ll ever get a definite explanation for it, but I really like your theory about it having ties to Olivia’s ability.

    “Did I detect a bit of Eye Sexin’ between Olivia and Peter at the Lab? Nah! It must just be my imagination – nothing will come of it.”

    Ah Roco, you can deny it all you want, but that’s not going to change the fact of how things have developed between them. I still don’t understand why you’re so against the idea of a relationship forming between them. Personally, I’ve been extremely impressed and pleased with how that relationship has developed over the last two seasons. Watching Lost, it has really bugged me to see how they handled the relationships on that show… all of them feel rushed and forced onto the viewer and I find that annoying. But I think they’ve done a great job with Peter and Olivia.

    As for the person who commented about how it bugged them that Olivia was attracted to Peter when she was supposed to be deeply in love with John, that never bothered me simply because it was so subtle. I could tell there was a certain amount of interest there, that she liked him as a person and was intrigued by him, but it was nothing like the love she showed for John. I didn’t find anything inappropriate or improper with the way she interacted with Peter. It was restrained and, though I could tell that she might feel something towards Peter, it was still obviously very new and obviously in the early stages and, consequently, wasn’t going anywhere because, at the time, she obviously loved John a great deal.

    “Walter talks about the synaptic transfer and the sharing of information across the unconscious state. I wonder, could a similar technique work across realities?”

    I think I’ve shared my theory before that I think that the process of going in the tank does allow communication between realities, and I’m sticking to that theory. There’s just too much that happens in the dreamscape from the tank that doesn’t seem to make sense if it was simply communicating through memories and such.

    Rewatching the episode also made me come up with another theory. As she first begins to notice her surroundings, she finds herself in several different settings for a short period of time, including a junkyard, a cemetery, and a bedroom. When she mentioned seeing her uncle’s kayak, and again when she’s briefly seen in a child’s bedroom, it made me wonder if those scenes might be places from her memory or could have something to do with her past. I don’t know what the significance could be, but as we continue to learn more about Olivia and her past, I’m going to keep my eye out for those settings.

    “What’s with the cat in the window?”

    I noticed that, too! I hadn’t ever noticed that before, so when I saw it this time around, I did a double take and wondered what that was all about. Completely random, if you ask me…

    “I’ve heard it claimed (and at one point I may have said this myself) that John tried to kill Olivia by running her off the road. I don’t think this was the case – I think he was just trying to shake her off, not murder her.”

    Oh, Roco. Are we going to go through this one again? I seem to remember debating this one with you quite extensively last year. I don’t see how you can claim that he wasn’t trying to kill her. No matter what they later reveal about John (and, for the record, I still don’t believe the ultimate conclusion that he was a good guy, after all), it seems clear in this episode that he didn’t care for her at all. Maybe he wasn’t actively trying to kill her, but he didn’t care for her well-being, either. As you point out, he wanted to escape… and if that meant killing her in the process, then so be it. He was extremely aggressive in his attempts to stop her pursuit, which doesn’t strike me as the actions of a man who was worried about the safety of the woman he loved. They were involved in a very high risk car chase and he had to have known that there was a high chance his actions could result in her death. But he didn’t seem the slightest bit concerned about that. And that bothers me. So, no, I’m not going to let him off the hook.

    “Why did Broyles send Olivia to that damned storage facility?”

    I agree with your assessment that Broyles was aware of Olivia’s abilities and the fact that she was special. One of the things that stood out to me the most in this rewatch was the way Broyles initially treated her. It was such a contrast to the more mellow, concerned Broyles that we now see. I concluded that he must have been testing her. By standing in her way and making her life as difficult as possible, he was able to see all that she was capable of in even the most difficult of circumstances. She had essentially no support whatsoever, yet she still managed to accomplish a great deal. I’d say that makes for a successful outcome of the test. I was especially intrigued by Broyles’ comment to Olivia that she “uncover something substantial, and I will have your back.” This stood out to me because that’s essentially what has happened… Once she proved herself to him and delivered substantial, significant results, he has supported her and has been very loyal to her. I think it’s very likely Broyles knew she’d been a Cortexiphan subject when they first met. He has shown that he’s very informed in things and it has been implied that he was aware of the Cortexiphan trials and such, so it doesn’t seem too far fetched to think he knew of Olivia’s involvement in that. It does make me wonder what else Broyles knows that he hasn’t been completely honest about. In that way, he’s a lot like Nina in that he seems to have his own secret agenda for things that are going on and he continues to keep Olivia in the dark in order to suit his own purposes. While I believe he’s acting for the greater good, it does make me second guess how much trust I place in him.

    “What does the streaming “which must not be bought” text on the window of Massive Dynamic mean, if anything?”

    This was another thing that seemed especially obvious in this episode as I rewatched it. Previous times I’d been aware of it, but this time it seemed so clear and obvious and it really bugs me that I have no idea what it’s supposed to mean.

    Adding to your themes, I noticed a couple of additional themes. First is what I like to call “The things you do for love” theme, which was conveyed very well through the way Olivia was willing to do whatever was necessary, no matter what the risk to herself, all in order to try and save John. I think this is a very strong theme in Fringe and I love the way it was portrayed in the Pilot. Another theme that stood out to me is hope. When Charlie asks for her opinion on Walter, Olivia responds that he’s insane, but also that he’s her only hope. I thought that was very interesting in showing how desperate she was to believe in that hope that John would be okay. She needed that hope and no matter how shaky or unreliable that hope seemed, she had to pursue it. And this theme was reinforced later on when Walter claimed that he could cure John, and Peter quickly told Walter not to give her false hope. I really liked the way they showed this thin line between hope and false hope.

    Random thoughts:

    In general, I was once again impressed by the quality of this episode. The story was fantastic, the acting was amazing, and the production was incredible. The Pilot episode really is an all around exceptional episode.

    I was also impressed with how convincing Olivia was when she tricked Peter into cooperating. She is really good at bluffing. It made me think that, if alternate Olivia is anywhere near as good at bluffing as Olivia is, then she might stand a better chance at fooling people over here longer than we expect her to be able to. Of course, things are different in that Peter and Walter have known Olivia for several years now, while in the Pilot Peter had just met her, but I still think that ability could go a long way in helping her convince them that she’s our Olivia.

    Kind of random, but during the chase in the storage units, there was a brief shot from above showing them running in between the storage units, and it made me think of rats running through a maze. I don’t know what any significance would be, but I still thought I’d point it out… that was a really neat shot.

    I really enjoyed seeing Peter’s feelings towards Walter now that we know more of the history between them. His anger and hatred of his father makes a lot of sense when you consider the way Walter had essentially neglected him while he was growing up, then he was sent to St. Claire’s, then he lied to him about his mother’s death. I can understand why Peter felt so strongly and he wanted nothing to do with Walter. It’s really neat to see how that relationship progressed and evolved from that point.

    I’m also still very impressed by the way they brought the three main characters together. It’s one of the highlights of the Pilot for me because you have three very different characters who come from very different backgrounds, who are also connected and they each depend on each other. I really like the way they are bonded and connected together and the Pilot established that really well.

    I also get the feeling that someone in Iraq was targeting Peter and trying to kill him. We’ve got Olivia’s seemingly insignificant comment about a car bomb going off in Iraq, then in Dream Logic we have Peter’s associate in Iraq telling Peter that he’d heard he was dead. All of this seems to imply that Peter was in a lot of danger at this time, and it makes me wonder why.

    Funniest moment: One of my all time favorite moments is when Charlie is in the lab and he notices Gene and asks “Is that a cow?” and Olivia simply responds “Yeah, that’s Gene.” They both delivered those lines with such straight faces and such a perfect dead pan that it never fails to make me laugh.

    Most outstanding moment: There are a lot of great moments in this episode, from the opening on the plane, to Olivia waking up after the explosion, to the first time they set foot in the lab, to the rooftop chase scene, but I think my favorite is everything surrounding Peter and Olivia going to St. Claire’s. The performances were subtle, yet full of gestures and expressions and actions that conveyed so much. From Olivia’s silent anticipation and hope as she waited for the doors to open so they could continue towards Walter’s room, to Peter’s anxiety and reluctance to meet Walter, to John Noble’s amazing portrayal of Walter… everything about that scene and the significance of Walter and Olivia meeting for the first time, as well as Walter and Peter being reunited, was absolutely brilliant.

    My rating for the episode: 9.0

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • LizW65 says

      Dunno if it can be considered canon or not, but the most recent comic book has an explanation for that.

      Like: Thumb up 0

      • LizW65 says

        “I also get the feeling that someone in Iraq was targeting Peter and trying to kill him. We’ve got Olivia’s seemingly insignificant comment about a car bomb going off in Iraq, then in Dream Logic we have Peter’s associate in Iraq telling Peter that he’d heard he was dead. All of this seems to imply that Peter was in a lot of danger at this time, and it makes me wonder why.”

        Dunno if it can be considered canon or not, but the most recent comic book has an explanation for that.

        (Sorry about the double post.)

        Like: Thumb up 0

    • says

      mlj,

      It was great to read your retrospective thoughts on this episode!

      “Ah Roco, you can deny it all you want, but that’s not going to change the fact of how things have developed between them. I still don’t understand why you’re so against the idea of a relationship forming between them. Personally, I’ve been extremely impressed and pleased with how that relationship has developed over the last two seasons. Watching Lost, it has really bugged me to see how they handled the relationships on that show… all of them feel rushed and forced onto the viewer and I find that annoying. But I think they’ve done a great job with Peter and Olivia.”

      It’s not so much that I’m “against” a relationship forming between Olivia and Peter – I just want it to be “earned” like the writers went on to promise. As others have commented, it also felt awkward seeing Olivia giving Peter the ‘look’ when she knew that the love of her life was busy dissolving into a puddle of invisible goo. I just feel that there’s no great ‘need’ for ‘Polivia’ – and this episode reminded me that they were possibly pushing this from the get-go. :o

      As for ‘Lost’, I would agree that the relationships of the ‘love kind’ are, for the most part (i.e. Kate, Sawyer, Jack), poorly executed – although there are also so real gems along the way as well. Personally, I feel that ‘Fringe’ is more of a character show than Lost, so I would hope that the relationships are handled with a higher degree of care and authenticity. But this Peter and Olivia thing – though at times it has glimmered, just feels haphazard.

      “Oh, Roco. Are we going to go through this one again? I seem to remember debating this one with you quite extensively last year. I don’t see how you can claim that he wasn’t trying to kill her. No matter what they later reveal about John (and, for the record, I still don’t believe the ultimate conclusion that he was a good guy, after all), it seems clear in this episode that he didn’t care for her at all. Maybe he wasn’t actively trying to kill her, but he didn’t care for her well-being, either. As you point out, he wanted to escape… and if that meant killing her in the process, then so be it. He was extremely aggressive in his attempts to stop her pursuit, which doesn’t strike me as the actions of a man who was worried about the safety of the woman he loved. They were involved in a very high risk car chase and he had to have known that there was a high chance his actions could result in her death. But he didn’t seem the slightest bit concerned about that. And that bothers me. So, no, I’m not going to let him off the hook.”

      :D All the rewatches in the world wont get us to agree on this one! I agree that he risked injuring her, but from his twisted point of view, it was either that or getting busted, and he couldn’t afford to have his cover blown. I disagree that he didn’t care about her at all – his ‘warning’ and subsequent ‘contacts’ surely confirm that he did care about her.

      Nice ‘rats in a maze’ catch!

      Good point on the execution in bringing the three main characters together. It was almost seamless.

      Great points all round, mlj!

      Like: Thumb up 0

  22. fedorafadares says

    “Kind of random, but during the chase in the storage units, there was a brief shot from above showing them running in between the storage units, and it made me think of rats running through a maze. I don’t know what any significance would be, but I still thought I’d point it out… that was a really neat shot.”

    I’ve thought about that particular shot, too. In “The Equation,” (look for this in that episode’s rewatch) there’s a particular pattern to certain props when Walter re-enters St. Claire’s. The artwork on the walls of the dayroom, the dominoes laying on the table, crayons laid out — they all have this “two-side-by-side/one-up-diagonal” pattern.

    In the overhead shot of the chase scene, the runners make this same pattern.

    Yes, it’s weird and obscure, but like a true Fringe fanatic, my brain makes these connections. Pass the pudding pops, please.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  23. SF says

    So many good points have been made by so many good commentators already! It’s fun to see everyone back and talking about Fringe :-)

    I have a comment to add (that I don’t think anyone has touched on yet), when you say Roco that you think maybe Olivia is seeing the Blight when she first transfers over, I agree, I do think its a hint about the blight. I also think it’s really foreshadowing what Olivia knows deep in herself from the cortexiphan trials, memories she’s still buried – even as of Jacksonville, she still can’t remember anything of that time consciously. Unconsciously, I think she does, and I’ve always thought the blight scenes, the wreckage of everything, as the future if she doesn’t save the world. Her mind was showing her what she needs to do, and and what will happen if she doesn’t. I also think she was facing the ending of the world she knew, and her dream state is suggesting this. It was also pointing out the things that she would need to survive – buried knowledge in the past (the graveyard), her childhood especially the cortexiphan trials (I think the bedroom is hers) and the uncle’s canoe. Don’t ask me that! I have no idea……anyway, what she first sees are not John’s memories, they are hers, that she moves through first. Only when she gets to the desert and the FBI seal on the floor, does John appear. Desert could be because she knows he is dying, it could also be because she knows something is wrong. It has always puzzled me that Olivia had no sense of anything being wrong with John, of his deception and working black ops. I think she did, but didn’t want to know. She doesn’t set seeing him in a growing field or lush setting, she sets John – or her shared dream state – sets them in a desert. It’s also a pun on being deserted. Certainly by the end of the Pilot, she feels deserted by him, that she knew nothing of him at all. The he’s not dead could also refer to her stepfather, who has disappeared, but isn’t ‘gone’, I think. The producers said on the dvd extras that the Pilot dreamscape holds clues to what is going to come in Fringe, so that’s how I’ve looked at it when I’ve viewed the dream in this episode. They also said some things haven’t been addressed yet, and unless we’ve all missed the canoe, that would be one!! lol

    I’m with mlj102 on this, I’ve never really liked John and I think he was trying to kill her in the car chase.

    I really enjoyed reading all your points and thoughts, Roco, and love that you think Anna is amazing in this episode! I think so too. I also really liked Peter’s character, and Walter stood out – he magnetized the story – and I love how all three of them become a team almost instantly, and how their roles are defined, the things they bring to the team, and as you pointed out, how they each relate to one another. I think this was really well done, and just amazing acting considering the characters are all so well-defined already here by the actors.

    One more thing, Peter’s phrase ‘ sweetheart, we all care about someone who’s dying’ – when I heard that tonight, I instantly thought of his character in Brown Betty,who is also cycnical, but underneath he’s a softie. This line is Peter as the hard-boiled cynic. I have to admit, my field of work involves people using this excuse as their reason for urgent and special consideration, so I am cynical when I hear it now too (and it really is used all the time). That’s how Peter protects himself from people – and yet Olivia gets through to him in the next breath with threatening him and bluffing him. In Midnight Peter says he’s “a card-carrying cynic, world-class, and that beneath every cynic there is a frustrated romantic.” I think we see that same idea here, in that Peter is cynical, frequently, in this episode, starting with his initial refusal to help her, but in the end, as many commentators said also, he wants to help. Specifically, he wants to help Olivia. The romantic side of him, and yes, I think that he liked her from the very beginning, especially when he discovered she had bluffed him. Yes, the writing and writers have stayed true to the characters pretty much in this episode!

    As for the idea it relates to his mother dying, I never thought that. I thought if it referred to anything, it was Walter locked up and slowly dying in the mental institution. But I never took it seriously, I took it as him not wanting to believe she really did have someone who was dying.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • SF says

      PS I completely missed the German link, so thanks very much for pointing that out! I liked your comments about the plane flying on autopilot.

      Like: Thumb up 0

  24. karslow says

    I re-post this here since it seems this thread is alive and read but being redundant (I posted the same thing in Greenx3 Red thread), if you feel this post is out of place please feel free to delete it :

    Did anyone tried to use the GGGR as a rule with the glyphs? Maybe taking every fourth letter or every fourth word or something like that (without forgetting the first season ep dumped in the second season). I’m also rewatching Fringe (that kayak just woke up the big frustration I have about this color sequence) and I never read anyone trying this (this doesn’t mean nobody did, I just didn’t read about it and I searched extensively, but you can always slip past things like that with the enormous amount of chatter this show generated). I know the glyph code was cracked and like a lot of people was a little disappointed, but seeing some words of certain episodes (especially those with character names), I got the idea that maybe a sentence or another word can be hidden in the glyphs; and the GGGR being such a mystery, even now, maybe is the missing clue to get that famous “deeper meaning” of the glyphs that was promised to us (if it’s not pure network malarkey to keep people guessing)

    Like: Thumb up 0

  25. charliefan19 says

    Woo-hoo, Roco, you rock! (no pun intended) This is like a re-review. And you know I love your reviews and insights!! I don’t have time to watch all these eps again so thanks for rfreshing my memories and perspectives with these! You continue to brighten my lowatus-darkness. :) :) :)

    No, I saw nothing between Peter and Olivia at ALL. I’m with you there.

    This ep reminds me of my “Broyles trepidations.” I want to know how much this guy knows but doesn’t say…and I am having weird vibes about Nina. I mean, she is literally as mysterious now as she was in the Pilot. we know waay more about her obviously, but it seems like we still don’t know…much at all. :P

    I thought they were setting Charlie up to be a traitor, too. But no, they made him a loyal and lovable sidekick…and killed him off. :’( I still grieve for Charlie…oh well, lol.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • karslow says

      I would really like alt-Charlie to go with Olivia when she’ll return to our reality. (not sure about my grammar here) He and our Charlie are my favorite characters and I kind of see him (alt) taking Olivia’s side against Walternate if he knows all the facts. Plus he’s awesomely cool and Acevedo kicks ass since Oz.

      Like: Thumb up 0

  26. Elaine says

    It dawned on me today reading someones (can’t recall whose) post earlier how the S2 finale bookended the pilot in a number of ways.

    First, there’s the parallels between Olivia’s determination to save John Scott’s life. Tracking Peter in Iraq. Blackmailing him to return to the states so she could speak with Walter. Bluffing him into releasing Walter, which led to John being healed due to the efforts of both men. In the finale, Olivia crosses universes in order to rescue Peter. Confronting herself, literally to get the answers she needs. Being reminded again by alt/Charlie that in many ways, he feels obselete…unsuited for the job they’re meant to do. Which leads her in both instances to plead with Peter initially to stay, and in the end to return with her. Not by tricks or bluffs…but an earnest hearted plea. In the pilot, the plea was colored by the slight strokes of attraction, admiration and friendship. In the finale, those hues are deeper, the strokes wider because their emotions are more invested.

    Not as notable, but just as significant was Walter and Bell’s inevitable reunion and subsequent confrontation after so many years. In the pilot, Walter expressed how much he missed while institutionalized. In the finale, he angerly accuses Bell of robbing him of his memories…perhaps even the essence of who he was only to discover that it was by his request because of the man he was becoming.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • SF says

      I really like your points here too, Elaine. The way you see Olivia and Peter at the end of S1, and then how it has changed and deepened at the end of S2 – and a continuation and done similarily – good catch. Here I am, an Olivia and Peter supporter, and it took you and FinChase to point out how that scene is done in both season finales!!!

      Like: Thumb up 0

  27. FinChase says

    Great review and great comments too!

    Some thoughts and questions I had on the rewatch:

    - Peter stayed in Boston for Olivia, not for Walter, just as he returned to our universe because she asked him to.
    - When Olivia and Walter first meet in St. Claire’s, he says, “I knew someone would come eventually.” On another level, it seemed to me that he really meant, “I knew one of your Cortexiphan children would come for me eventually.”
    - I sort of miss that slight (ok, not so slight in the Pilot) antagonism between Olivia and Broyles. It just seemed edgy, and being challenged brings out the best in Olivia.
    - Did John Scott not know the storage facility was where Steig was working? He did nothing to sidetrack Olivia there; in fact, he was the one who started picking locks, and then called Olivia to join in the chase when he spotted Steig.
    - Why was it necessary for Scott to kill Richard Steig? He was already in custody. If it was to protect his cover, that failed miserably.
    - The strange music that plays when John Scott sits up and pulls off the monitors makes me feel like everything, all our expectations are being turned upside down. This seems appropriate because Olivia’s world turns upside down as soon as she listens to that tape.
    - Peter seemed very apprehensive when Olivia approached him in Baghdad and identified herself as an FBI agent.
    - Was Nina Sharp startled when she heard the name of the agent who came to see her? Did she recognize it right away or did she have to look up on a list of names that Massive Dynamic claims doesn’t exist? Did she send a message to William Bell?

    Idle thought:
    - I wonder if Peter would have gotten the job in Iraq if Olivia hadn’t bluffed him into returning with her.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • SF says

      “Peter stayed in Boston for Olivia, not for Walter, just as he returned to our universe because she asked him to.”

      Nice catch, FinChase. It certainly points out the similarities between the two seasons and especially Olivia’s motivations and relationship with Peter. Both seasons ended with Olivia asking him to stay.

      The Steig warehouse bit and killing him: I think he killed Steig to cover his tracks, to protect himself. It was really a mind-blowing moment the first time I watched the episode, when John kills Steig. In a funny way, John being anti-hero – Fringe turning our expectations upside down like that – has continued all through the show. It certainly has made me aware that characters are not always who they appear to be, which is a theme that Roco has touched on in his reviews. Though even knowing that, I still get continually surprised by Fringe’s characters anyway! As for why Broyles sends Olivia to the warehouse with John – I think Broyles knew John was Black Ops, but not what he was working on, and he wanted to test Olivia to see where her loyalties lay – would she protect John when she found out, or would she turn him in? Investigate him?

      “On another level, it seemed to me that he really meant, “I knew one of your Cortexiphan children would come for me eventually.” ”

      Do you think he means that an actual cortexiphan subject would come to him, or someone about the trial? It seems to me that his words could also mean that anyone researching his work would also come to see him. He knew someone would come, eventually. I think that’s the key, that his work was important and he would be sought out. That’s what I took them to mean. I do think though that it isn’t a coincidence that the one who rescues him from the asylum is the same one who his alternate self has now imprisoned (reverse symmetry).

      “Did she recognize it right away or did she have to look up on a list of names that Massive Dynamic claims doesn’t exist? Did she send a message to William Bell? ”

      Another million dollar question! When did Nina find out who Olivia was? I think she knew early on, possibly between this episode and the next one. I’ve always thought there was a list or some kind of records that they are using to find the cortexiphan subjects (she and Broyles now at end of S2). And yes, I think she alerted Bell that Olivia Dunham test subject was back and working with Walter. Imagine that kind of news and what Bell must have thought!!

      Good points, FinChase!

      Like: Thumb up 0

      • FinChase says

        “Do you think he means that an actual cortexiphan subject would come to him, or someone about the trial?”

        I’m not sure if Walter’s mind was rational enough to remember/think of the the Cortexikids at this point. I don’t believe he remembered Cortexiphan at all until Olivia asked him about it in “Bad Dreams.” I’m sure also that it was not until that episode that he suddenly connected Olivia Dunham, FBI agent, with Olive D., test subject. But just as Olivia does not consciously remember the drug trials, I think Walter remembers things underneath, and he knew the Cortexiphan subjects would grow up and come looking for answers. That’s my take, anyway. And Olivia come looking for answers, even though she didn’t know all the questions yet.

        Like: Thumb up 0

        • SF says

          I think Olivia on some level -unconscious to her – recognizes Walter. Even though they appear to not know one another, they are so instantly able to work together and she isn’t afraid of him the way Broyles is hesitant around him. There is some vibe between Olivia and Walter that speaks of familiarity, even though Walter can’t remember the trials, and Olivia has no memory of her childhood. I think you raise a very good point here, Fin. Still, I don’t know if we can say just a cortexiphan subject would come. Walter damaged so many people over the decades of his work!

          I like your point too: “And Olivia come looking for answers, even though she didn’t know all the questions yet.” She did come for answers, and is still coming to him. And she still doesn’t have all the questions, either! Certainly if she had remembered anything about her experiments she would have come looking for him immediately to get answers. Which makes me wonder why Nick Lane didn’t, when he got himself released from the institution. Nick was waiting, but Olivia wants answers. Interesting differences between the two.

          Like: Thumb up 0

  28. Laura says

    To mlj: “It surprised me to see her so happy and calm and almost carefree at times during the episode….”
    It surprised me, too. But still, she’s not like Alt-Olvia. At all.
    When I think about it, I always think there’s a great job to be done to make the infiltration successfull.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  29. says

    Great revisit! OK here’s a few things I considered…

    there’s another secret with Peter, Walter asks Olivia since she has his files not to “tell Peter”, but there’s nothing in there that she’s noticed. It’s possible that doesn’t refer to the crossing of universes but rather whatever William Bell was referring to in the s2final when he told Peter he was holding up well (and wasn’t referring to what Peter called “a little universe hopping between friends)…. so anyway with Robert Bishop and the he’s not dead gravestone and the symbolism of the glyphs…. is Peter cloned off Robert maybe?

    …also I don’t think we can assume 100% our Elizabeth is dead, we only think that because that’s what Walter told Peter after Peter went overseas. Peter now believes she killed herself, but did she? or is she somewhere else too?

    The kayak…. too much detail there quite apart from the gggr spots for it not to lead to something… the plot thickens in the future around Liv’s mother and uncle maybe?

    Yes, Germany is an ongoing theme, but so is Iraq, with the living bomb humans coming from there and also the oil sample with the nasty disease. And the “lost” episode which came out of sequence, the guy doing the possessing was also ex army, and at the end of the episode landed in someone that I think looked like the oil exec in the disease episode (though that may be going too far LOL)… anyway lots of Iraq themes too.

    Great recap, thanks Roco.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • LizW65 says

      “…also I don’t think we can assume 100% our Elizabeth is dead, we only think that because that’s what Walter told Peter after Peter went overseas. Peter now believes she killed herself, but did she? or is she somewhere else too?”

      I think at this point it makes more sense for her to be truly dead. There’s an unwritten rule of television that nobody really dies unless we, the audience, see a body, but in this instance, the fact that Peter knows Walter lied to him about the suicide suggests that he did some investigating of his own following Elizabeth’s death.
      Assuming he returned home immediately when he learned of her death (and didn’t retreat even further into himself and put more distance between himself and Boston) he would have naturally questioned the hospital staff, police, and so on, and learned the truth rather quickly.
      This would also have given him the motivation to sell Walter’s prized German first editions, which we know he did “around ten years ago”, as he would have had to clean out his mother’s apartment following her death, and his anger toward Walter for lying to him could have led him to try to hurt him indirectly by selling off his possessions.

      Like: Thumb up 0

  30. says

    For the word Zeno on the canoe, i’ve come across this. I don’t know if it hints something to the show, but i thought it was important enough to share with you:

    In the (bow and) arrow paradox, Zeno states that for motion to be occurring, an object must change the position which it occupies. He gives an example of an arrow in flight. He states that in any one instant of time, for the arrow to be moving it must either move to where it is, or it must move to where it is not. It cannot move to where it is not, because this is a single instant, and it cannot move to where it is because it is already there. In other words, in any instant of time there is no motion occurring, because an instant is a snapshot. Therefore, if it cannot move in a single instant it cannot move in any instant, making any motion impossible. This paradox is also known as the fletcher’s paradox—a fletcher being a maker of arrows.
    Whereas the first two paradoxes presented divide space, this paradox starts by dividing time – and not into segments, but into points.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  31. Xochitl says

    I loved this! In my country the local network finally released FRINGE,
    that I’m thinking they should have not, believe me, you all be
    laughing about the translation and the bunch of inconsistencies they
    create with such a horrible job,and the voices!! and they are doing
    two episodes in
    a row, I know somebody is going to say that that is fantastic, but
    in my country that’s like totally disrespectful! Sorry! it was the
    only place where I could say it and people will understand my
    frustration. :)

    that first scene with Olvia and Jhon, looking so happy always brings
    tears to my eyes, it’s like what september said,

    so the thing is that I’m basically rewatching at the same speed Rocco
    is rewatching, and to be completely honest, and call me stupid if you
    want, I have never totally understood the whole Jhon Scott thing,
    waht exactly was he doing? him gettng involve with olivia was a
    mistake as part of the job? and for the love of anything I can’t
    still thread that with the whole story, I just don’t get it,maybe
    it’s due to the fact that I started late with the show, I did watch
    the pilot the first time but I didn’t get hook up until something
    between BOUND and THE NO-BRAINER.

    I’m incredibly curious about that tombstone on olivia’s dream
    “he is not dead” and someone pointed out that on OVER THERE it’s the
    line “he is here”, which just makes me think that they are refering
    to someone specifically, just because of the he, I used to think it
    was Peter but I don’t really know, and for some weird reason now I
    think they are refering to SAM, which makes absolutely no sense.

    And here is something I hate and love, since the beginning of season
    2 I started to think that somehow Peter stayed for Olivia, decided to
    change for her, and someone else said that he stays everytime she
    asks, on the pilot, on the arrival, the very obvious line in OVER THERE,
    and maybe I have been reading to many fan fics, is it possible that
    Olivia met Peter before? I still don’t know if our peter or this peter,
    she had so many lost memories from Jacksonville, and if that is the case,
    is their love real? my point is, where they meant to be together by
    fate or somebody (meaning walter in his experiments) predispouse them
    (sorry I don’t know how to write the word right) to get together? is
    there some kind of codependency between them making olivia able to ask
    peter to stay and him feel compelled to, or physical codependency for
    that matter? I also have this theory that somehow, with the paper the
    observer gave olivia, that there is a prophecy around that either makes
    peter and olivia enemies (the saver of the universe/ protector Vs. who
    is suppoused to destroy it) or complements to save it, meaning, olivia
    has the ability to open a door, and do many other things, but what if
    Peter is the enerby, the battery or something?

    Sorry it all came to me right now.

    Like: Thumb up 0

    • LizW65 says

      “incredibly curious about that tombstone on olivia’s dream
      “he is not dead” and someone pointed out that on OVER THERE it’s the
      line “he is here”, which just makes me think that they are refering
      to someone specifically…”
      Robert Bishop, maybe? He’s about the only one left unaccounted for.
      “…maybe I have been reading to many fan fics, is it possible that
      Olivia met Peter before?”
      I avoid fanfic like the plague, but I’ve had this thought as well. We know that Olivia and Peter were both three at the time of the Cortexiphan trials, so Peter Prime would still have been alive, but I’ve occasionally wondered if one of the objects Olivia saw from the Other Side could have been “our” Peter. Could she have had flashes of him the way that she had flashes of the Other Side in Season One, and even spoken to him?

      Like: Thumb up 0

    • Lys says

      Regarding Peter and Olivia, do you know what else I think is intriguing? Interestingly, for someone that acknowledges Peter as a “pain in the ass”, she does not even atempt to judge him – on the contrary, it seems that she clearly identifies with him: they seem to easily communicate without words, only with their eyes (mind?), and although Peter looks like he is running away from something (even with her, when they’re talking about something regarding his past, he tends to look away), he easily gives in to her – he looks genuinely concerned about her and why does he want or needs to help her, specially after discovering that there is no file on him?? Could this be remotely related to something Walter did when tey were still children? Like, he figured out there was a way to transfer ideas from a mind to another, while inconscious… Is what we saw – the drugs cocktail and the tank, the exclusive procedure for that…?

      Like: Thumb up 0

    • Lys says

      Just re-watched the episode again and I froze the player when I saw that. I also think that there is something else to be seen, rather just a simple maze…

      Like: Thumb up 0

  32. Alison says

    I could go on and on about how much I loved this episode, and how it’s still one of my favorites but I would be typing for a while.

    “Seeing Morgan Steig spew his guts up on that poor stewardess is still one of the sickest Fringe scenes ever. EVER!”

    Agreed! Defiantly, without a doubt, one of the MOST disgusting scenes on this show!! *shiver* ugghhh…I always laugh when I see it though, because it’s so gross. LOL

    Like: Thumb up 0

  33. Rohin says

    general theory i have here. Am sure all of you have seen the leaf with the triangle. am also sure you know that it is an equilateral triangle. Equilateral triangle represent balance because all angles are the same and so are the lengths in fact the angle is 60deg. Now on one of the posters of fringe advert shows peter, olivia and walter and three yellow globes..placed in an triangular fashion.

    I believe this is a reference to the 3rd universe, the balancing universe..from where the observers originate. Imagine an equilateral triangle, sitting on one edge one can see or in this case “observe” the other two sides/edges. We all knw the observers can travel between the two universes, but i also believe that they interact with the third one. I think olivia will escape out of the cell but will end up in universe 3. as for bolivia she will be found out by peter who will see her entering the typewriter shop. i guess either September or walters college girl who he tested with drugs will identify bolivia.

    If u see a flaw in my theory, feel free to point it out. or if it has triggered something in your head, write it out will be great to discuss it.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  34. Jessamyn says

    One of the things that has always stuck with me about this episode is how Walter asks Peter questions about his vitals the moment he sees him. I can just imagine Walter sitting in his little room, wondering if what he’s done has had adverse effects on peter, but never being able to check.

    Like: Thumb up 0

  35. Lys says

    There are so many things in this pilot, one could write a whole book about it!! Loved the way the relatioships are portrayed – the relationship between John Scott and Olivia didn’t look like it would last; Olivia trully respects Charlie; Broyles seems to put Olivia to the test (we easily get the feeling that he knows more about her than he says); the way she puts up with Walter (she’s very patient with him and it doesn’t seem forced, she stays with him when he is not lucid, making him focus when necessary); Astrid will just be a background character. I’ve already posted something regarding Olivia and Peter…

    There was, nevertheless, something else I thought to be very interesting – the whole Olivia and John Scott go to the U-Case storage situation. Well, Olivia starts by complaining about Broyles, thinking he’s acting like that because of Stanford (I believe she’s wrong, he’s simply testing her), then there’s the whole “I love you” moment (aww, she looks genuinely happy), then they get to the dumpster and start rummaging through it, while above them, a light flickers. Now, I think that that flickering had a steady rythm, a lot like morse code (am I watching way too much Fringe?). And then Scott picks the lock to a storage unit and we get to see some stuff – what’s interesting here is that at the first one we see an old couch and at least a cardboard box with the word “fragile” written on it; then, in another storage unit, we see an rusty car, with the letters MD on its grill; then in the last storage unit, we see what appears to be a laboratory. In my mind, it translated to this: the 1st unit represents Walter – I immediately remembered the file boxes that he has at the lab; the 2nd unit represents Peter – “I can bring anything mechanical to life” (yup) and the 3rd unit represents the crossing to another “world”, more than just Walter’s lab. It as if we are shown the way things will be played!

    Also, the colours. Yellow, red, blue and white are very significant in this episode. For example, when Walter sees John Scott for the first time in the hospital, we see a blue-ish room, with transparent curtains, the blue gowns, the blue-ish walls, the white lights, the red in the electrical outlets and some yellow thingies on the wall… Let’s not forget about our blue (at the airport, when Broyles talks to Olivia, next to the Massive Dynamics logo on one of the airplane motors…) red, green, yellow and white lights – there is even a green-green-red sequence!!! :)

    Another thing: when Olivia sees John Scott, when she’s in the tank, it intrigues me way too much the fact that first, she is at a junkyard. What was that about?! And then there’s a cemetery and the whole “he’s not dead” situation. Could those be direct clues to Peter??

    Like: Thumb up 0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>